Author: Rachel Mills

Adoption conference touches many lives

Everyone becomes like their parents in one way or another. There are physical characteristics that manifest themselves immediately, as well as personality traits and others that appear at different stages throughout life. On Monday, Nov. 22, an adoption conference was held at UVU. The conference was sponsored by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The keynote speaker was Barbara Smith, news anchor for ABC 4. She shared her personal story of adoption and the struggles that she went through while adopting her child. There were dozens of classes held throughout the day. Topics included: trends in international adoption, proactive adoptive parenting and psycho-education and resources for foster families who adopt. These topics only cover the surface on the deep subject of adoption. One class focused on understanding the courage of adoptive parents. It was taught by Stan Swim, currently chairman of the National Council for Adoption. He and his wife have adopted children and he shared bits of his wealth of knowledge on the emotions and feelings that can come as couples embark on the adoption process. “Every person has hopes, dreams and wishes and grief that goes along with adoption,” he said. Swim also said that adoption will “test communication in a marriage.” We live in a society that has laws that look to place children in homes that are “good replacements for birthparents … and where...

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Over $47K raised to sustain Haiti

Most want their dollars to stretch as far as possible. On Saturday, Nov. 6, students and community members had a chance to put their money to good use. This particular Saturday was different for the 388 registered runners of the Sustain Haiti 5K race. Before the 9 a.m. start time, 75-plus employees of Pinnacle Security were volunteering their time to get the race set up. The proceeds of the race, totaling $47,061, were raised from online runner registrations and donations along with fundraising and matching efforts of the corporate sponsors. The money will help the devastated country of Haiti via the nonprofit organization Sustain Haiti and the Net Impact Student Chapter at UVU. Mikey Heinz, senior vice President of Installations at Pinnacle Security and President of UVU’s Net Impact Student Chapter, said that Pinnacle Security’s motivation was to “do more; [we] wanted to help out somehow, where we could be effective.” Sustain Haiti is a nonprofit organization that focuses on teaching the people in Haiti ways to become more self-sufficient during the recovery process. Some of the things that they have done on previous trips to Haiti have been providing valuable training on sanitation and hygiene, teaching hands-on approaches in gardening and educating the Haitian people on clean water technology. Another area that they have made a difference has been working to identify micro-enterprise candidates. All of these things...

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Utah’s health policy

Symposium attempts to address the national health care debate. On Thursday, Nov. 11, the College of Science and Health, along with the department of Public and Community Health, sponsored a lecture, “Looking to the Future.” The key areas that were addressed were the accessibility, quality and cost of care and what needs to be done to address them. “I found it interesting. There has to be a compromise; one way isn’t better than another,” said Tiana Gardner, a Community and Public Health major. “There definitely needs to be a change, possibly merging all of the positive characteristics would be a good start.” Panel members included John Nelson, M.D., MSPH, former president of American Medical Association and Utah State Medical Association and advisor to national and state councils on healthcare in the community; Joe Jarvis, M.D., MSPH, founder of Utah Healthcare Initiative, former Nevada state health officer, and occupational and environmental health safety consultant; and Bradley Daw, a member of the Utah State House of Representatives Health and Human Services Committee. One of the areas of discussion was the healthcare exchange, which became available in 2009. This was explained as a place that an employer, typically a small businesses employer, can go and put money in for their employees. The employees are then able to tailor their insurance to their personal needs. If the employer puts enough money in to...

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Your Name Here

With a cool $2.5 million dollars coming into this university over the next ten years in return for the rights to have the events center named the UCCU center, some may wonder what exactly does it take to get a name on a building here. Events centers such as the newly named UCCU center require contracts for a certain number of years in order to have their name on the building. This provides an opportunity for name recognition to be built over contract term. This is not the case, however, for other buildings on campus. Once a name is on a building it is there to stay as long as the building is standing. According to Vice President of University Relations Val Hale, there are two ways to get a name on a building here. Honorary naming is the first way to get your name on a building. For example, the Sorensen Student Center was named after Wilson Sorensen, a key figure in the evolution of the school. The second and most common way to get a name on a building is to donate money to the school. This will put a name on a building in perpetuity. A percentage, usually 25 percent, of the cost is paid by the donor and they are then given the naming privilege. With donors becoming harder to find, it becomes a marketing...

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From Carribean scuba dives to classroom instruction

There are many people who feel it is their calling to pass along knowledge and who enjoy participating in the learning of others. One of these people is Maria Groves, adjunct professor of Earth Science. She teaches Geology 1010, along with three sections of the accompanying lab, Geology 1015. “I like teaching at UVU because the emphasis is on having the learners be responsible for their learning as we guide them,” Groves said. “It is not about how many facts the professors know or how many research papers they have published, but rather how prepared students are once they have been taught by you.” Groves aim is to prepare lectures that she herself would want to sit through. She often sorts through material late into the night while her family sleeps in an effort to find content that will engage her students. The lectures focus on topics that will appeal to a broad range of majors. Self-proclaimed as an “inquisitive and curious” person, she feels most at home when she is in nature. Groves shares her passion for Earth with her family, who she often takes on field studies. Her adventurous spirit has taken her to 10 volcanoes, all continents except Antarctica and on over 30 scuba dives from the Caribbean to the Pacific Ocean. Earth Science comprises many areas of study. For instance, environmental issues “put a nice perspective...

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