Author: Lincoln Op't Hof

A wide range of generational and situational factors affect poverty

Mental illness and poverty have a close relationship Organizers and attendees of the Real Talk session on poverty clarified the definition of poverty and discussed the various factors that cause poverty and how life circumstances affect how people perceive poverty. A significant part of the discussion focused on the difference between generational and situational poverty, and some attendees shared personal stories about their experiences with each category. The discussion group defined situational poverty as the type of poverty that results from an event. The events that cause people to fall into poverty are usually unexpected. There are many life events that can result in situational poverty, according to the discussion group. Loss of a job, sudden medical expenses or even lengthy and costly treatments such as those for cancer can cause people to fall into poverty. Greg Brooks, an anthropology sophomore, spoke about how, in part resulting from medical expenses within his family, his father chose to leave college and join the military to help provided financial security and insurance. Even after joining the military, the financial situation was tight because of the low entry-level enlisted pay, according to Brooks. The group also talked about generational poverty, which is the type of poverty that people are born into and raised in. Group members considered how this type of poverty is often more difficult to escape because of a lack...

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Sabbaticals, quality-focused instruction and shared governance in question by some faculty

Faculty members issued an open letter to university administrators expressing concern about quality education and shared governance, for which, the recent shift in the processing of sabbaticals has raised additional concerns. In total, 60 members of the university faculty endorsed the letter that was issued on Feb. 5. The letter began by calling into question administration support for faculty research and sabbaticals and then transitioned to broader concerns about quality instruction and shared governance. According to UVU policy, “[s]abbatical leave is an opportunity offered to qualified faculty to engage in scholarly and creative activities that will enhance their capacity...

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Initiative to update general education curriculum is promising but raises concerns

In December, members of the President’s Council announced a comprehensive review of general education curriculum that will occur in 2018, but some members of the UVU community, specifically some faculty members, are concerned about how the review and possible changes are being pursued. President Matthew Holland, Craig Thulin, the faculty senate president, and Rob Smith, the student body president, all signed the letter that announced the plan involving a 40-person committee and potentially significant adjustments to general education curriculum. Rick McDonald, an English professor and secretary of the UVU chapter of American Association of University Professors, sent a letter...

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UVU becomes home to international symbol of peace and unity

Community and organizational leaders participate in the Global Peace Tree planting ceremony. Photo by Kim Bojorquez UVU joins other communities throughout the world that have been recognized for effort toward unity and peace with a Global Peace Tree; the planting ceremony was held outside the Losee Center on Nov. 28. UVU is the site for the first peace tree to be planted in the United States. There have been seven other Global Peace Trees planted throughout the world. SHEROES United and Art4Peace partnered to bring the peace tree to UVU. According to the event information page, “[t]he peace trees...

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