Author: Abby Van Buren

To our readers

Readers, The reason we do not have the police blotter this week is because school policies have changed. Over the years, the UVU Review, along with the public, have been allowed access to the school police department’s initial incident reports just by asking for them. The initial incident reports contain a police officer’s narrative of the crime that occurred and how it was handled. As of two weeks ago, we no longer get the reports and all we get is the time, location and a one word description of the crime that occurred. While the absence of a narrative is legal, the university has chosen to give us the legal minimum amount of information for every crime that occurs on or around this campus. Without a narrative, we don’t know how crimes are handled at the university or any outcome of the situation. We were told that the reasoning behind the institution’s decision to format police logs this way is so that it protects survivors of assault. The UVU Review has never published the name of a victim of a crime, and it would go against our ethical standards to do so. Institutional indifference grows in darkness and this change to the police reports does not allow any sunlight to the crimes that occur on this campus. The absence of a narrative on the police logs gives a false sense of security to students if we aren’t given the information of a situation such as an assault, theft, drug crime or. With UVU’s Title IX Office facing a federal investigation by the Department of Education’s Civil Rights Office, this move does not promote institutional transparency. Fortunately, initial incident reports are public information and the Government Records Access and Management Act allows us to request the information. This process can take days compared to how it used to take us 20 minutes to walk to the police station to look at the reports. The police blotter section of our newspaper is the most read and the most telling of our campus environment. The UVU Review will continue to investigate by sending multiple GRAMA requests to the university in order to inform our readers about the crimes that occur on campus. The late veteran reporter Helen Thomas once said, “we don’t go into journalism to be popular. It is our job to seek the truth and put constant pressure on our leaders until we get answers.”...

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Campus community tells presidential search committee to prioritize inclusivity

Photos by Cody Glassett The university needs a president that will look out for minorities, according to Linda Walton, chaplain and philosophy instructor, during a presidential search committee meeting held in the Science Building Auditorium Nov. 28. “There aren’t many minorities in Utah Valley, one might think, but there are 40 faith groups on campus,” Walton said. Students and community shared with the 24-member search committee, comprised of representatives from the Board of Regents, trustees and institutional stakeholders, including faculty, staff, students and more, what they want the next president to be like. “Inclusivity is one of the most important...

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Police Reports: Staff Choice Edition

The following police reports were reported over the 2017 Fall semester Sept. 8 Library Disturbance An officer was called to the Fulton Library after two people were reportedly arguing. It was believed that one student was part of the DACA protest taking place that day. However, the officer found it was a student having a loud discussion with a cafe employee about comic books. They informed the officer that their argument was neither aggressive. Nor were they fighting. The officer reminded them that they are in a library and need to be respectful of the other students.   Aug....

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Administration to increase price of parking permits

Plans for new freeway bridge underway Photo by Sammie Jo Raymond, Frank Young pictured above  Parking pass costs will increase, free purple lots will move and other significant parking changes will be made in the coming years, according to Frank Young, associate vice president of Facilities and Planning at the Student Voice Forum hosted outside the Grande Ballroom Nov. 16. “We are planning a parking increase next fall,” Young said. Annual passes for the yellow lot will increase from $90 to $115. This cost increase is to encourage students to use public transportation, according to Young. Starting fall of 2018,...

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One Stop stopped for good

Illustration by Tyler Carpenter The One Stop circle that has been the main hub for serving students was discontinued as of Nov. 1. “After careful consideration, and in an effort to improve the student experience, the decision has been made to make a significant change to the One Stop area,” said Andrew Stone, associate vice president of enrollment management, in an email to The Review.   What was formerly known as One Stop will now exclusively be used to assist students with financial aid and scholarship questions. Other services previously offered at One Stop will continue to be provided...

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