Author: Gregory Wilcox

Finish It! “The Inferno” by Dante Alighieri

So, ideally, this book should probably be reviewed along the whole “The Divine Comedy.” Yet such a review would take pages, and “The Inferno” provides more than enough on its own to merit a solitary review. The book’s adventure really begins as Dante, with Virgil as his guide, begin their descent down the circles of Hell. On the way, they encounter a whole bunch of interesting characters who are mostly Italian politicians that Dante doesn’t like. At the entrance, or the “vestibule of Hell,” the sinners, who never chose good or evil but rather sat on the fence, are tormented continuously by flesh-eating flies, which they run away from for all eternity. Our heroes then meet the “virtuous pagans” on Hell’s uppermost circle. These are they who were moral during their lives, but, because they were not Christians, were sent to Hell. But hey, they at least get the very top level of it, which actually doesn’t seem all that bad, judging by the fact they just lounge around and eat grapes while only mildly being sorrowful for their lot. As mentioned before, it becomes clear that in some ways “The Inferno” is a way for Dante to condemn his rivals and those who he didn’t like to Hell. But this is not completely true. Dante does meet some people whom he loved in the fiery realm. One example...

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BLOG: New science building approved

It’s a good time to be a scientist at UVU. Recently, Utah’s House and Senate approved a bill that will give UVU a new state-of-the-art science building. Though the cost of this building is around $45 million, the bills approval is in large part due to the fundraising and petitioning efforts of the UVUSA College of science and health academic committee. The new facility will include a dozen technology-enhanced classrooms and a 400-seat auditorium for lectures and demonstrations. Since the current science building was constructed back when UVSC had only 8,000 students (compared to the current 26,322), this will be an important step for innovation in science at our university. It is not yet certain when the new science building will be...

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Equaleyes yourself: Idaho jam-band coming to Utah

Equaleyes, a jam-rock band from Idaho, will be gracing Salt Lake City soon with their diversified sound. Their music, as lead singer and guitarist Jeff Crosby says, is centered on creating positive experiences. “With our music, we try to convey a sense of togetherness, having a good time and freedom,” Crosby says. And certainly freedom is expressed in their music, which utilizes a wide array of styles and themes to deliver a distinct sound. The music they play is themed on genres from dance to reggae to jam-rock and more. “We all have a bunch of crazy influences, which may be why we have a diverse sound,” says Crosby. “But Phish is definitely a big influence. Bands like The Allman Brothers and other good 70s rock are also highly influential to our sound.” Though playing based on numerous influences may lead some bands astray, Equaleyes appear to be doing quite well for themselves. So far, they’ve opened for such notable acts as The Wailers, The Jerry Garcia Band and others. They’ve also toured extensively across the west, and have played multiple music festivals, including The Squaw Valley Earth Day Festival in California and Hempstock in Oregon. Equaleyes started as a trio a couple years ago, but soon took on another band member to achieve a fuller sound. Like a lot of bands, they do not have a label, but...

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Math woes

If you’re like me, you don’t care for math too much. I mean, you probably see its utility and everything, but know that it’s an area best left for people like Matt Damon who are actually good at it. But, as a college student, you can’t just shove math away—it’s required before you can graduate. You can dodge the responsibility of taking it for a while by enrolling in yoga classes, but it’s always there lurking in the background until you accept your fate. That said, here are a few simple ways you can tackle the math mammoth. Get to know the professor—He/she is cool and wants to show you how much fun math can be but you just didn’t know it. Humor him/her. Show genuine interest if it’s an ‘A’ you want. Pick a good professor—Math is much more bearable when you have a teacher who can explain math to people who don’t like it. Math lab—I got through my math courses thanks to the math lab. A guy named Seth helped me a lot. If you’re still there Seth, thanks again. The math lab is a free service, but I suggest leaving tips on the table. Math groups—Like most burdens in life, math is best shared with or dumped onto others. Back of the book—God bless the back of the book! Inside are many of the answers…...

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Correctionary: This week’s word – Natural

What is natural and what isn’t? This is an interesting question because within the public sphere there are many assumptions about what constitutes natural behavior, and many attempts to justify arguments by appealing to nature. Unfortunately, this is often an incorrect usage of the word. One reason for constant misuse of naturalistic arguments might be because “natural” has numerous definitions. Its core connotation, however, is best defined simply as “conformity with the ordinary course of nature.” The problem is when appeals to nature don’t actually align with processes in nature. For example, much of the justification for anti-gay sentiment hinges on the belief that marriage or sex between a man and a woman is natural, whereas it is unnatural between two men. Yet, zoologists and anthropologists have shown that this is a naturally occurring behavior found in many different animals and across cultures. Thus, it can’t be said to be unnatural. This isn’t to discredit the value of marriage. Indeed, that it’s not natural is sort of the point of it. What a man and woman are saying is something like, “I really like you, and I know as time goes on I may be tempted to go off with someone else, but I promise I won’t!” The natural impulses toward infidelity that may arise are willfully and unnaturally resisted. Many also misattribute the word natural to mean the...

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