Author: Diego Ibanez

The vegan dilemma

Vegans choose to abstain from animal products out of moral and ethical concerns. Despite a sympathetic community, vegetarian and vegan options on campus are few. When Co-President of the Animal Allies Club Breana Reichert wants to eat at the cafeteria or other food services on campus, her choices are limited. As a vegan, she chooses not to consume any products or by-products that come from animals. She can give a whole list of reasons why she is vegan, including how much healthier it is and how much better it is for the environment – a lot of carbon waste can be traced back to the food industry, particularly meat production. “The AAC club has tried at least twice previously to work with the UVU dining services, but both attempts have failed,” said Reichert. According to Reichert, the school does not seem to take her or her kind seriously enough to permanently change to more vegan-friendly menus. Philosophy professor Dr. Karen Mizell is another vegan on campus. “When I discovered how workers are exploited in these slaughterhouses and how corporations like Monsanto are patenting seeds, I thought to myself, ‘I can’t support this’,” Mizell said. While the university has many other issues to address, such as gay rights, immigration and budget cuts, it seems that vegans and vegetarians have been put on hold for the time being. Her family soon...

Read More

Rush me Silly

[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/14935124[/vimeo] Club Rush is upon us once again, and while all are welcome, not all are happy.

Read More

The Stoner’s temple and its faithful worshipers

Make spice illegal – the sooner the better As I walked into a room with Bob Marley flags and hookahs alongside water bongs, three men who look like they were in their mid-twenties rose from a sofa to greet me. The one who stood up to shake my hand looked very much like Jesus; long hair, calming eyes and a peaceful vibe. His name is Bradli Anderson; he’s an employee at Imagine Real Peace Smoke Shop and his girlfriend is the owner. Last time I came here was about a year ago when something called “Spice” was beginning to pick up popularity. Some said Spice was the greatest invention of all time – and really that’s what it was if you were on parole, didn’t have enough money to buy the real thing or were smoking Spice when you called it that. I asked Anderson if he has heard about Spice soon becoming illegal. “Actually that’s only in Provo,” he said with a spiritual smirk. “We are still selling it and as long as we don’t sell near unincorporated areas, we won’t get bothered.” So I asked him about the apparent police visits where smoke shops were asked to voluntarily stop selling Spice. “That was only in Salt Lake,” he replied. I asked him how much money Spice brings to the shop, and his response was surprising. “Actually we...

Read More

Club Rush needs reform

Despite bigger crowds, clubs disappoint For those who purposely avoided Club Rush because of the obnoxious hip-hop music or overly delightful school-spirited smiles: You didn’t miss much. Clubs weren’t very different from last year and the heat would have melted most of your free chocolate anyway. Considering that our university status requires a more serious and respected tone, Club Rush needs to reflect the importance of these clubs. Club Rush should, therefore, set an example of who we are as an institution and set in motion what the possibilities are for the coming semester. Location, location, location The issue of placement for certain clubs was apparent; for example, the lonely, disgruntled music club was placed on the outskirts of the courtyard. Consequently, the booth runners expressed discouragement with the lack of importance of music education. Any visitor to our university might come to the same conclusion as well. According to Ashlee Head, assistant to the VP of Student Clubs, those interested in having a booth were asked to sign up early in order to get a good location. This does not guarantee that relevant clubs get the attention they deserve while some irrelevant clubs (we have an International Modeling Club?) received more attention some might deem meritable. UVU has made it a priority to increase freshman participation in activities and therefore deliver a better first year experience. Even President...

Read More

The Arizona Immigration law: Power to the people or power from the people?

A couple weeks ago, Johana graduated from Provo High School. Along with many of her peers, she had been expecting to attend UVU this fall. Her career of choice: Education.  “Right now, I’m hoping to become a teacher,” she says. Johana came, legally to the U.S., when she was 5 years old. Shortly after, their visas expired and Johana joined the undocumented population. “During high school, many councilors or advisors would say, ‘You can’t get this or that scholarship because you’re illegal,’ and I’m usually scared of cops, but they are supposed represent safety.” When asked if she’s aware of the Arizona law, she replied, “I’ve just stopped thinking about it because sometimes I feel hopeless…because the less you know about it, the less you worry about it. It can bring you down”. Utah is among 12 other states that will propose a bill similar to Arizona’s.  According to Rep. Steve Sandstrom, an Orem republican, he has enough votes to make such legislation pass.  On his web site he states, “ Illegal immigration is negatively impacting our society and economy. I am committed to reverse this damaging trend.” If he’s as diligent as he sounds, it could possibly be enforced as early as February of 2011.  Although this seems some distance away, it’s not the kind of solution some think will suffice for a monumental topic such as immigration....

Read More