You have the right to remain silent, now speak up!

A recent Supreme Court decision will affect arrests and their implications throughout the United States. The ruling specifies that suspects must now vocally invoke the right to remain silent. It had been previously held that remaining silent indicated that the right or privilege was being used. The ruling, which passed with a 5-4 vote, was delivered June 1 in the case of Berghuis v. Thompkins. The decision in Berghuis clarifies the original decision found by the Court in the 1966 Miranda v. Arizona case. In Miranda, the Court found in the majority opinion that the person in custody must, prior to interrogation, be clearly informed that he or she has the right to remain silent. Many favor the finding by the Supreme Court. “I do favor the recent Supreme Court ruling regarding a verbal response to the Miranda admonition” says John Brewer, Director of Public Safety at Utah Valley University. “This ruling takes the ambiguity out the situation where a person remains silent. Such clarification is welcome in my experience and opinion.” Not everyone, however, thinks speaking to invoke the right of silence is needed. “I think a right is something that is a constant, or a given,” says Alison Poulsen-Nef, a Paralegal Studies student at UVU. “I shouldn’t have to say I invoke my civil rights if someone is not treating me fairly. The right to remain silent...

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