Outreach to UVU’s combat veterans

Outreach to UVU’s combat veterans

UVU and Provo Veterans Center offer free counseling

To see war from afar is one thing, but to experience war first hand is another entirely and for those men and women who risked their lives for their coun- try’s sake, the Student Health Center has teamed up with Pro- vo Veterans Center to offer free group counseling for war zone veterans every Wednesday.

In SC 221 on Wednesdays from 10 to 11 a.m., war zone veterans have the opportunity to meet with other veterans to discuss problems they deal with from their experiences at war.

 

new group leader of the Provo Veterans Center and a USAR veteran saw a need for outreach to veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, the younger generation of veterans. He said that at UVU alone there are 700 to 800 veterans and of those veterans at UVU about 300 need help. Hooper said that an estimated 20 to 30 percent of veterans suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
Dr. Richard Hooper, the new group leader of the Provo Veterans Center and a USAR veteran saw a need for outreach to veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, the younger generation of veterans. He said that at UVU alone there are 700 to 800 veterans and of those veterans at UVU about 300 need help. Hooper said that an estimated 20 to 30 percent of veterans suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
“We have regular attendees [at the meetings] who bring real problems to the table. We are there to help support them, help them solve prob- lems and connect them with resources,” Hooper said.

 

In SC 221 on Wednesdays from 10 to 11 a.m., war zone veterans have the opportunity to meet with other veterans to discuss problems they deal with from their experiences at war.

 

Hooper has a LCSW, Ph.D. and two other veterans have Masters level and specific training in dealing with war zone veterans.

 

During    Fall    semes- ter, from Oct. 26 through Dec. 14, meetings will be held each week to provide counseling on issues such as anger, sleep and night- mares, anxiety or sadness, relationships and isolation, caution and civilian read- justment.

 

Meetings will recom- mence for Spring semester with plans to have another group session start for spouses of combat veterans.

 

“There is a big need to provide support to the spouses of veterans,” Hooper said. “Spouses suffer right along with the veterans and it is a big problem for spouses.”

 

If spouses of veterans are interested in a support group they can reach Dr. Hooper directly at the Pro- vo Veterans Center.

 

For veterans who cannot attend the group meetings at 10a.m. on Wednesdays, contact Provo Veterans Center and free services will be made available at the clinic, or if there is a need, another group could be formed.

 

All services are free and all meetings are confiden- tial. For the free services, Veterans are asked to bring their DD-214 and can have received anything but a dishonorable release.

 

Provo Veterans Center 1807 North 1120 West Provo, Utah 84043
UVU Student Health Center Room SC-221 (801) 863-8876

Written by Jamie Ghormley

PHOTO COURTESY OF DVIDSHUB

Leave a Reply