Author: Paula Rogel

Getting an education just got easier

UVU is expanding again, all the way to Thanksgiving Point in Lehi. Beginning this summer, students can enjoy the convenience of an additional campus: UVU North at Thanksgiving Point, located upstairs in the new Mountainland Applied Technology College (MATC) at 2301 West Ashton Blvd. in Lehi. The Office of Extended Studies coordinates off-campus sites to give students opportunities to obtain their education through non-traditional times and locations. According to Ruth Gowans, Manager for Off-Campus Programs, MATC invited UVU to use the building. “It’s a good partnership for both entities,” Gowans said. “We’re both trying to serve students.” Over 400 students were attending evening courses at the Lehi Junior High site, but it had little parking and classes were held in trailers. With the move to the new building, Extended Studies is now able to offer day and summer courses as well as new classrooms. “We’re extremely ecstatic about this move,” Gowans said. “It’s a great location, a beautiful building and a good fit for us,” This summer Extended Studies is offering 22 courses, which include a wide variety from American Civilization to Writing. All courses are 1000 and 2000 level courses that fill General Education requirements. Students will also be able to fulfill the coursework needed for an Individualized Associate Degree. According to Gowans, students can be assured classes will be taught by great instructors. She said many hours...

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The UWEP continues to promote higher education for young women

More research from the Utah Women and Education Project, UWEP, indicates extracurricular activities, finances and aspirations are significant influences as to whether or not young women attend and graduate from college. Results from the study are presented to the public in the form of easy-to-understand research snapshots intended to inform young women and anyone influential in their lives about the benefits of a post-secondary degree and how to ensure young women pursue one. Information presented in research snapshot No. 7 indicates young women throughout the state are more likely to attend and graduate from college if they participated in extracurricular activities in junior high and high school. According to the results, six specific activities were linked to those women who attended college longer and/or graduated from college. The six activities were involvement in a religious organization, participating in volunteer and community service, playing high school sports, belonging to a student club, being a member of an honor society and serving in the student government. Holding a leadership position in any of the extracurricular activities during high school proved to be the most significant factor for increasing a young woman’s chances to attend and graduate from college, according to the research. However, nearly half of the study participants had no leadership roles in high school and were shown to be significantly less likely to attend and graduate from college. UWEP...

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UWEP releases vital information

Young women need “very strong” collegiate influences Editor’s note:  The first set of snapshots in this series was published in the February 21, 2011 edition of the paper. Women in Utah have the lowest college graduation rates in America and research is being done to find out why and how to fix it. The Utah Women and Education Project, UWEP, has released three more research snapshots, which reveal additional reasons why Utah has low college attendance and graduation rates among females and what can be done to initiate change. The purpose of the two-year research project is to educate and motivate young women and those influential in their lives about the importance of obtaining post-secondary degrees. The research snapshots are a way of presenting the results to the public in a user-friendly way. The recently released snapshots point to the importance of beginning the discussion about college with girls as young as elementary age, but especially with those in middle and high school. “We’re finding the earlier those conversations take place, the better,” said Susan Madsen, director of the Utah Women and Education Project and an associate professor of management in the Business department. “Elementary age is not too young to start talking about college,” Research Snapshot No. 4 details the influence of school counselors and administrators on a young woman’s college decision. Thirty-two percent of participants in the...

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Speech competition winners announced

Participants, judges and spectators gathered in the library auditorium on the evening of Thursday, March 10 for the final round of the fourth annual Marie Clegg Jones Speech Competition. Many students entered the competition, but it was Janelle Neal who walked away with first place and a $500 award. Neal said she participated in debate and persuasive speaking in high school and won several competitions. Her persuasive speech focused on three steps one should take to properly support a cause. According to Neal, those three steps are to find a cause you believe in, join a support group surrounding the cause and stand up for what you believe in by getting actively involved. “After seeing the political unrest in Egypt and the protests taking place, I felt compelled to encourage American citizens to do the same types of things, rather than just complaining about the economy and the government,” Neal said. “I have participated in several political protests and rallies and I like the feeling of being a part of something. I want everyone to experience that.” Being a non-traditional student, full-time employee, wife and mom to four daughters, made the win even more exciting for Neal. “This is big for me,” she said. “It makes me feel like I can be successful in whatever I try … and winning the prize money really helps contribute to my education.”...

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A creative brain awareness fair

The School of Education held its second annual Brain Awareness Fair on March 4 in the McKay Education building to creatively increase understanding of the human brain, its abilities and cognitive functions. This year the focus of the fair was based on John Medina’s book Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School. Pre-service Elementary and Secondary Education students were each assigned to present one of the principles in a creative way to appeal to different types of learners and make it relevant to each one. According to fair organizer and Assistant Professor in the Secondary Education department Dr. Suzy Cox, she wanted to give the students an opportunity to engage more deeply with the course content and think about how they could teach it to someone else and use it in their future teaching careers. “Just reading a book doesn’t give students that personal insight,” Cox said. Medina presents the science behind ideas about how the brain works and then offers ways to apply the principles effectively in everyday life. The 12 principles are exercise, survival, wiring, attention, long- and short-term memory, sleep, stress, sense, vision, gender and exploration. “We decided to use Medina’s book to help focus students’ projects on things that are supported by research … in real neurological studies,” Cox said. Three rules highly emphasized at the fair were exercise,...

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