Photos by Cody Glassett

The composition of full-time faculty has increased from 50 percent to 57 percent since 2012 as a result of administrative goals, according to UVU’s senior vice president of Academic Affairs, Jeffery Olson.

“When UVU became a university, a target was set for it to have full-time faculty members teach 55 percent of its sections,” Olson said. “UVU exceeded that goal in 2017 with 57 percent of faculty being full-time.”

UVU has seen a relatively small increase in the number of faculty on campus over the last ten years, according to the school’s Institutional Research and Information Factbook. Although the number of faculty has not significantly changed, the composition has. In 2008, approximately 70 percent of faculty were part-time, according the school’s institutional report.

Full-time faculty are also teaching more classes in recent years. Almost 60 percent of student credit hours on campus are taught by full-time teachers, meaning more teachers are dedicating more of their time to student success.

Students from professor Judy Stewart’s Communication 1050 class, Feb. 8.

“UVU values the contributions of full-time faculty members and adjuncts. They both provide high quality teaching to our students,” said Olson.

Olson adds that even with contributions of full-time faculty, UVU still enjoys the benefits of adjunct faculty members. Supplemented expertise, added flexibility, increased course selections and reduced costs to UVU students, families and taxpayers are among some of those benefits. All faculty, regardless of status, agree to devote their time to teach, mentor and to lead students in the community.

Although UVU has increased its full-time faculty composition, the student-to-teacher ratio still hovers around 22 to one. A ratio that is considered poor compared to other U.S. universities according to College Factual, a college evaluation website.