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Saving money on textbooks

Saving money on textbooks

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According to the National Association of College Stores, college students spend $655 a semester on textbooks. That seriously sucks. So, what can UVU students do to make sure that they save as much money as they can each semester?

First off, never buy the textbook. If you think you might need it for future semesters then buy it, but if this isn’t the case then just rent the book.

The next piece of advice is a risky one, but trust me on it. Don’t buy the textbook immediately. Wait a week or two to see how desperately you need the book before you actually get it. The reason why is you might realize the professor doesn’t use it, or there are alternative ways to get the information you need for the class. Last semester, I went without buying a single textbook and I still earned A’s in my classes.

Find alternative places to get your books besides the campus bookstore. Amazon does great deals for college students, and if you have Amazon Prime it’s even better. I also like to go to Barnes & Noble to order my textbooks. The Book-X-Change is another great place to rent fairly cheap books, and they have a helpful staff. Go out and find places that have the books that you need.

Have you ever tried e-books? Some pros of using e-books is that you can easily find certain portions of the book that you might need for your homework assignments or essays, as well as being able to have the book with you at all times. The con, however, is that reading on a computer or mobile device can be distracting. You’ll be reading your book and then you’ll get a text message, or get bored and go on Facebook or Snapchat. It’s a dangerous game to play.

Do you honestly need the current edition of the textbook? That’s a question that you must ask your professor. They might recommend getting the most current version, but always ask. In my Art 1010 class, the teacher told us to not waste our money on the current edition and get the first edition instead, which only cost me a dollar.

So that’s how you can save money on textbooks folks. It’s that easy. For me, a good semester for me is one where I didn’t buy the textbook and still passed the class. Don’t be the student that spends $655 on books that you won’t use or read.

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Tyler Carpenter

One thought on “Saving money on textbooks

  1. Bernie’s 2016 public college/university tuition plan (btw, 80% of students attend public colleges) would’ve cost like 1.25% of federal expenditures. Textbooks could easily be subsidized (reimbursed).

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