The Review

Independent Student Voice of UVU

Calendar

March 2020
S M T W T F S
« Feb    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

How to use the Fulton Library

How to use the Fulton Library

Need to get your study on? Look no further than the Fulton Library. Nestled between Liberal Arts and the Classroom Building are five floors of books, periodicals, DVDs and information on just about any subject you can dream of.

With this much knowledge in one place, it might be a little overwhelming to navigate for a first-timer; but with a few tips you can find just about anything you need for class, or merely to satisfy your own curiosity.

Here’s what you need to know about the Fulton Library.

Classification

You may be familiar with the Dewey Decimal System, which assigns numbers 000-999 to different subjects, but the problem with Dewey is that it’s limited. In larger collections, such as academic libraries like the Fulton Library, the preferred method is the Library of Congress Classification System. The Library of Congress system is much more granular because it classifies things at a more specific level. This system uses letters A-Z to differentiate general subjects and further divide into subclasses within each and even further so you can fine tune your search. It’s a lot to take in if you don’t know how it works, so ask a librarian if you get lost.

Textbooks

Certain required textbooks are available for student-use if you don’t have your own, so check with the front desk if you lose yours or need to get ahead before your book arrives in the mail.

Equipment

As explored in a previous article, the Fulton Library is onboard with the “Library of Things” movement, meaning students have the ability to check out equipment like cameras, GoPros, keyboards, life-size models of human skeletons, telescopes and more.

“It’s about breaking down cost barriers,” said Dustin Fife, UVU’s Outreach Librarian in 2015. “[With the equipment we offer] you and your friends could film, edit and score an entire movie without buying anything.”

Group Study Rooms

If you need to get together with classmates to work on a group project, you can schedule a time here.

Quiet Floors

If you need a quiet place to gather your thoughts and hit the books, floors 3-5 are designated for quiet study, while 1-2 are less restrictive of the noise level.

Librarian Chat

Have a question for a librarian, but no time to get to the library right now? You can chat with one on the library’s website.

Sean Stoker

Sean Stoker

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.