A Spooky Attack on your senses at Nightmare on 13th

Nightmare on 13th Street, strategically placed on 1300 South in Salt Lake City UT, is a Gothic castle sticking out from its surrounding cityscape. Right off the 305A exit, if you aren’t looking, you will still see this crazy adventure house.

Nested at the gates is Slayer, the demon welcoming all to enter his home. This monster, red in color and loud in speech, moves on its own to foreshadow the incredible animatronics inside.

The combination of actors and these animatronics make for the overall experience rated top in the nation by Buzzfeed, Yahoo, USA Today, and American Haunts

The start of the haunt

Owner Mike Henrie fell into the business of Haunted Houses. When meeting a Haunted House owner, you never really know what you are going to get. Is this a mad man that loves to see fear? As for Mike, he fell into the business of Haunted Houses 30 years ago. Mike previously worked in fast food, and with changing business partners, the space and concept for Nightmare on 13th opened up.

Starting in 1990 as the Institute of Terror Haunted House, this terror attraction has grown to be 36,000 winding square feet that change every year.

Gordon Kerr, Marketing Director at Nightmare on 13th, explained that this haunted house is a year-round affair. All year new haunts and scares are thought up and put into place. Gordon said that 20% of the haunt is different every year, making the haunt a unique experience for guests even if they have been many times before.

Their main season starts in September and ends on November 1-2 with their Blackout Experience; these are nights include all the scares of the attraction with the addition of complete darkness. The attendees are given finger lights as their only source of light going through the house.

Their main season starts in September and ends on November 1-2 with their Blackout Experience; these are nights include all the scares of the attraction with the addition of complete darkness. The attendees are given finger lights as their only source of light going through the house.

Guests waiting in line to get tickets at Nightmare on 13th Street. Photo courtesy of Chloe Nielson.

Best line to stand in

The best part of Nightmare on 13th is the lines. Lines usually are a hassle and tiring. Nightmare has mastered the art of a good line. Not only are there Fast Pass and Skip The Line options, but there are interactive scenes and even a scary theater to watch while waiting for your turn.

Outside Quinn, Nightmare on 13th cast member told us that he loves working at Nightmare. Quinn has been one of the 150-170 cast members for two years. When asked what his favorite room in the attraction is, Quin laughed and said, “the chainsaw room.” Yes, there are chainsaws!

Once inside

Once inside, you enter various fear lands playing into any fears you might have. Snakes, clowns, electrocution, floors are falling under your feet, claustrophobic tunnels, and lots more.

Students Cassie Arnita and Chloe Nielson react to various items in the haunt.

The attention to detail is fantastic in this attraction; all of your senses will be stimulated. One portion of the haunt is a Clown-run ice cream factory. In this section, you can smell ice cream and feel cold all around you as clowns talk about your demise and the use of your body to make the products.

Even with the threats, Gordon told us that Nightmare on 13th prides itself on being a family-friendly affair. While still obtaining their goal of being scary, no gory or blood is used in the haunted house. Families should feel OK bringing in their kids for fun, those under twelve accompanied by an adult.

For a great night with a great group of people trying to give you Nightmares, go to Nightmare on 13th only a 30-40 minute drive from UVU.

Photos courtesy of Chloe Nielson and Cassie Arnita.

More Halloween Goodness

You can find more Halloween coverage from the UVU Review here!

Avatar

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.