Steer clear of the cafeteria and experience find dining

Culinary arts students demonstrate their skills, not only for a grade but for real diners. Ai Mitton/ UVU Review
Culinary arts students demonstrate their skills, not only for a grade but for real diners. Ai Mitton/ UVU Review

It’s not exactly “Hells Kitchen” here, but it has all of the excitement of the TV show minus the swearing British guy.

“Full house guys, let’s rock and roll,” shouted Chef Todd Leonard to kick off the “Lunch at Greg’s” event, which is put on by the UVU Culinary Arts program on Feb. 17.

The Culinary Arts students feverishly prepare the seven course meal for the packed room of eager guests. The guests ranged from students to professors and local business professionals, all there to have a good meal and an unique experience.

“We’re not open to make money. This is meant to be a good experience for the students and for the community. After all, we are teaching a real class,” Leonard said.

Leonard took over as chef instructor for Greg Forte who retired after 20 years of teaching and cooking on campus.

“My sister is one of the students here,” said Allyson Barry, there on lunch break from the Provo School district.

Barry and her friend Jasmine Tanner, a radiology major here at UVU, have been twice before.

“This would be a great place to take a date for lunch, ” Tanner said.

As the final course was served, people could be overheard saying, “Let’s give them a hand.”

Applause and a grade are all that the students receive today, but many of the students go on to become chefs at some of the top restaurants and country clubs in Utah.

Each week the menu differs. Previous weeks have included poultry, lamb, wild game and vegetarian options.

Next week is pork. The kitchen will close for two weeks when the new block of classes begins and then the cooks will be back to work with a new group of students and more hungry people to feed.

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