Freedom of expression and disruptive attire

Freedom of expression and disruptive attire

When the temperature goes up, the clothing comes off.

 

With the weather getting warmer, students are beginning to wear less clothing, which may raise questions about the institution’s dress code in terms of modesty.

 

UVU’s Policies and Procedures states uniform and dress code requirements for employees but does not mention an official dress code for students, nor does the Student Handbook.

 

Director of Judicial Affairs and Dispute Resolutions Ashley Robertson explained that while there is not an official dress code specified to students, there is an expected standard of dress and behavior that comes along with it.

 

“If someone is wearing something that is obscene in a manner that can cause [other students and faculty] fear, we would step in and ask a person not to wear that to campus,” Robertson said.

 

Robertson also mentioned that these matters are handled on a case-by-case basis seeing how every person is distinctive as well as every situation.

 

Although there have been times when faculty have reported feeling uncomfortable due to students’ attire, there have never been any problems where serious action had to be taken.

 

Some students were not aware of the fact that there is no official dress code at UVU. When asked how she felt about the matter, Monica Gubler, a junior, said she didn’t feel affected as long as students were considerate of others.

 

“I think that’s fine as long as students dress appropriately,” Gubler said.

 

Students differed in opinions when asked if a dress code would change their minds about UVU.

 

Kanisha Jenkins said she liked that there is no policy against hats, tank tops and shorts, but a dress code wouldn’t change her thoughts about the school.

 

“You went through the whole thing in high school, you’ve gotten used to it,” Jenkins said, referring to the hypothetical establishment of a dress code.

 

Other students, however, did not feel the same and said their thoughts about the school would definitely be affected if a dress code were to be enforced.

 

“I probably would not want to go here as much anymore. I feel because of the college environment we’re all adults, and we don’t need to be controlled by outside forces like that,” said Sam O’Barr, a freshman.

 

Robertson said it is important for students to be aware that there is a difference between freedom of expression and expressing oneself in a manner that is disruptive or has a potential to interfere with classroom proceedings. She said UVU students seem to be aware of how their clothes may affect others on campus.

 

“Overall we have a campus that is mindful of what they wear,” Robertson said.

 

Because there have never been any serious problems with attire, UVU students do not have to expect a dress code in the future.

 

By Yvette Cruz
Staff Writer

One Response to "Freedom of expression and disruptive attire"

  1. Adam   April 11, 2016 at 8:13 am

    “If someone is wearing something that is obscene in a manner that can cause [other students and faculty] fear, we would step in and ask a person not to wear that to campus,” Robertson said.
    ———————-
    Why on earth would a shirt or some shoes or the like cause students or faculty to fear? That seems rather silly.

    Reply

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