Consumerism during the holidays

What does a person need? Do we even know anymore? For centuries people have bought something, then used it until it was worn out, then replaced it. In my case, and I am probably not alone, seldom have I used a piece of clothing until it has any indication of ware and tare. It is usually lost or replaced by that time.

I think it’s crazy how much stuff we are told we need. It is nice to get some extra things besides the basics—food, water and shelter, but seriously, I am guessing this is not what your shopping list looks like when you walk into Walmart.

This only gets amplified at Christmas time.

My dad asked me what I wanted for Christmas this year. I thought long and hard and came up with some things, but told him that I really don’t need anything. He responded saying, “None of us need anything really.” And so we are faced with the task of looking for more things to need, or want.

I think it is strange that we look for things to want just because of the time of year it is. It’s like we spend all year long buying what we want, then when December hits, we try to think of more to add to our collection of things.

Are these things even well used, or after some use do they gather dust on a shelf or get shoved under the bed adding to the clutter?

It seems the market has given up hiding the fact that we just like to buy a lot of stuff. I saw a commercial the other day for Prilosec OTC, with Larry the cable guy telling viewers that a flavor coated heartburn medicine is great because we Americans like to buy things that don’t have a real purpose.

“Now why make a flavored heart burn pill?” Larry said. “Cause this is America, and we don’t just make things you want, we make things you didn’t even know you wanted, like a spoon fork, spray cheese, and jeans made out of sweat pants.”

Another commercial made by Mazda, told customers to turn their signature into a new car, saying that right now you can buy one with no money down. This is incredible! Guys, are we falling for these types of sales points? I hope we are not, because I think it is disgusting that we are not only thought of this way, but are sold when people tell us this is what we are.

Tiffany S. Thatcher is the Life Section Editor, and can be reached at dancertiff@gmail.com

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