Author: Tom Larsen

Let’s talk about it: Desert Noises

Desert Noises have been a local favorite for a few years now.   With the help of local artist Joshua James and Slowtrain records, the band is releasing their first full-length album, Mountain Sea as an LP record. The band will celebrate the release of their record with a show on Monday September 26 at Muse Music Café in Provo. We sat down with Kyle Henderson from Desert Noises and talked about the release.   V: What is the current line-up of DN right now?   Kyle: The band was started by a coupe of friends and me in...

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Journalism’s past and future

Ross Douthat, columnist for The New York Times, will be speaking on campus Tuesday, April 12, in the Sorensen Student Center. Douthat’s lecture, “From the Yellow Press to the Fourth Estate and Back: How Journalism’s Past Became Journalism’s Future,” is being sponsored by the Utah Democracy Project and The New York Times Readership Program. According to Don LaVange, executive program coordinator for the Center for the Study of Ethics, Douthat is a conservative columnist that brings a point of view that is similar to many on campus. This is something that should interest all students and he hopes many will attend. “He is articulate and a very, very bright thinker, the kind of person we like to bring on campus,” LaVange said. Along with writing for The New York Times, Douthat is a film critic for National Review and contributes to the video debate site www.BloggingHeads.tv He was also a senior editor at The Atlantic and a blogger for www.TheAtlantic.com He was the author of “Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class” and co-authored “Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Working Class and Save the American Dream.” The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be in room SC 206A and B and will begin at 11:30 a.m and will go until 12.45 p.m. Box lunches will also be provided on a...

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Clubbing through college

According to the official clubs website, there are 166 clubs on campus. Sarah Roseborough may want to add to that number; at the very least, she wants to help each of those clubs kick it up a notch. Roseborough was recently voted the new vice president of clubs and is very eager to build the clubs program on campus. “More than anything, I just want to help clubs to become more successful,” Roseborough said. “A large majority of them are successful and are doing well … but others are either too new to the game or they haven’t quite figured out how to be as successful as they can be.” Roseborough, a Salt Lake area native, attended Cottonwood High School. Her sister attended UVU, so she decided follow suit. “My sister actually came here and she really loved her experience and I figured I would come and check it out,” Roseborough said. Trying to make the most of her college experience, Roseborough decided to get involved by getting a position with the activities branch. She talked with others involved with clubs and decided that it was what she wanted to do. “I kind of figured out that I really, really, really wanted to do it,” Roseborough said. “I wanted to help clubs especially. I just got a passion for it and decided to go for it.” Roseborough said she...

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Invisible Children show students how to make a difference

Over 100 students sat in the library auditorium as they watched the new movie by Invisible Children. Invisible Children, a nonprofit organization that helps children in central Africa, was on campus on March 1. “The Congo Tour” event screened Tony, a film that tells the story of boy who grew up in the war-torn country of Uganda. Vic Pereyra, an Integrated Studies major with emphasis in Philosophy and Religious Studies, thought the movie was well done and very inspiring. “It was really impactful,” Pereyra said. “It was professionally done and tied into emotions, but it wasn’t just emotions, but a call for action.” Laren Poole, one of the three founders of Invisible Children, said in the movie, regarding the experience he had when he went to Uganda for the first time in 2003, “It ruined my life. It ruined it in the best way.” For part of the presentation on this year’s tour, Collins Angwech, a woman from northern Uganda, shared her story of growing up in the devastation of her home country. Uganda and other central African countries like Congo, Central African Republic and Sudan, are under attack by Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army. They kidnap young children from villages to fight in their army. “We live in so much fear of abductions of the LRA,” Angwech said.  According to her, many children in these countries...

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How to be you(tiful)

Look through a magazine. Turn on a television show or movie. They are visible all over the place: unrealistic representations of both men and women. People are bombarded with images of thin women with the perfect body and men with rock-hard abs and broad shoulders. The misconceptions about the “perfect” body are what Dr. Nicole Hawkins is fighting, with the help of the Student Health Services program “Be you (tiful).” On Thursday Feb. 24, Student Health Services is offering a workshop with Dr. Hawkins, who did her dissertation on images of women in the media becoming thinner and the effect these images have on people. “I like to educate the public about the misrepresentation of body image by the media because of airbrushing and other photo manipulating tools,” Hawkins said. Many popular television shows and magazines display “perfect” bodies without showing the extreme measures that people will go through to look good and setting an unhealthy standard for the public. Student Emily Purdy feels that the media portrays women in a very negative way, generally inferior to men. “Women are objects beneath men. Stupid, nagging, annoying and their only usefulness is sex,” Purdy said. “Women rarely get a positive spotlight in the media.” Brandon Black, an Exercise Science major, and James Poai, an Illustration major, think movies like Twilight have made it bad for men. They also think that...

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