Author: Todd Parkinson

My ringtone, myself

With a sudden buzz and a song of recognition, ringtones seem to be a way that students choose to reflect their individual personalities. In classrooms, it is common to hear a familiar interruption generated by cell phones. Custom ringtones or text notifications are ways that people can recognize each caller by either a personalized song or alert. Professors and students alike usually make a remark about it when it happens. “Girls [especially] try to get attention with the ringtones that they have,” said alumnus Ben Shaw. Personal alerts do make it easier to prioritize calls. Though the typical college assumption is that everyone is a student and that should be top priority, that is rarely the case, especially at a commuter school such as this. Non-traditional students may have children, which is by far their top priority. That being said, if custom ringtones are used, parents know immediately who is calling and if there is an emergency at home that needs their attention. Perhaps some individuals may feel like they are reaching a status quo based on how many times they answer their phone in class. Communication professor David Scott will actually kick his student out of class that day if they are caught texting, and if the student answers a phone call, they have to leave for the rest of the day with no attendance points. Ringback tones...

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Building homes and lives

Non-profit organizations like Habitat for Humanity give less-fortunate families the opportunity to improve their living conditions. The success of the program depends on volunteers, and the university’s Volunteer Services is willing to do what it takes to make the dream of owning a simple home possible for these families. Habitat for Humanity is a volunteer organization that refurbishes homes for donation, and in some cases, breaks down former meth lab houses and rebuilds them. The land is usually sold through government auction and is bought at a decent rate. In order to promote the project and raise funding, Habitat for Humanity organizes events such as the No Snow Indoor 5K, held Feb. 26. The goal of the UVU Student Service Council is to plan and implement such student run events and programs. On March 5, one of the homes will be complete. There will be an event celebrating the moving in of the benefitting family. The Student Service Council will be working to provide more opportunities to serve like this in the future. “The more volunteers that help us, the merrier,” said Krystal Rasmussen, a student involved in volunteer services and Habitat for Humanity. The Volunteer Service Center is located on the second floor of the Losee Center. During regular office hours, members of the staff are available to answer questions and otherwise assist interested...

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Oh, the places you’ll hang out

On this campus, there doesn’t seem to be a designated spot for students to hang out. This holds true for nearly all types of students. Jace Patrick, a Public Relations major, expressed that BYU has more of a defined set of hangout spots due to their strong Latter-Day Saint culture and University of Utah students find places to hang out that match their area of individual diversity. Yet at UVU, there are not really such places. “There is [just] no place to hang out here,” said Patrick. One place on campus that does have a consistent turnout is the Institute building, where Latter-Day Saint students gather. A constant flow of students go there to enjoy a swear-free and non-controversial setting due to the LDS atmosphere inside the building. There are also ping-pong and pool tables for their enjoyment. The sad thing is that a lot of students just come to their classes and leave without having extracurricular experiences on campus. It seems that most students lack the ambition to care about what is happening around campus. A problem that may be the cause of a lot of this is the “on the fence” atmosphere between a pop culture society and a Latter-Day Saint society. This type of tear leaves students in Utah in a state of identity crisis, walking around campus without socializing with any type of group. The...

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Becoming a True Wolverine

Locking lips for school spirit. True Wolverine was filled with kisses and wandering hopefuls, along with some who were confused about what the event truly was. The event, which took place on Jan. 27, was headlined with Davie Millet and Katie Sawatzki, a couple who got engaged at the homecoming basketball game earlier that evening. “I wanted to propose to Katie right after she took the shots in between the game to surprise her,” said Millet. They were the first couple to kiss at the event. For some reason, many men that came to this event seemed to think that they would increase their odds of scoring by bringing other men with them. Perhaps they might want to research statistics on the topic if they plan for more success with women in the future. Part of the reason the True Wolverine tradition came about was because of Kisstixx chapstick. Kisstixx, developed by former UVU students, is a special kind of chapstick that utilizes the chemistry of kissing. Kisstixx comes in pairs, a flavor for each partner. When the couple kisses, the flavors mix, causing even more fun and excitement. Popular flavors include fire and ice, strawberry and chocolate, and raspberry and lemonade. In celebration of Kisstixx, two female students kissed each other in honor of the popular Katy Perry song “I Kissed a Girl.” Two big, hairy men also...

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