Author: Robbin Anthony

Pumpkin Progenitors

In preface, may I say that this is not about witchcraft, risqué or zombie cos- tumes or corn mazes. Before the Christianization and com- mercialization of the Celtic festival, Samhain (pronounced sow-en) and its evolution from a sacred time to the second most commercially lucrative day of the year (only the celebration of the Christmas season generates more financial profits) people living in the British Isles marked this time of year as the most important of fire festivals, or holy days, because it marked the end of the old and the start of the new year. The full moon on or around November first marked the completion of the harvest and the completion of necessary preparations for the chilled darkness of the winter months. The Celts believed that during the previous night, Oct. 31, the souls of those recently departed were rest- less and desired more time in the world of the living. To prevent these souls from overtaking their bodies, the Celts would dress in frightening apparel and roam their neighborhoods making noise to scare the spirits away. As the new year approached, home fires were extinguished and then relit from embers gathered from Druid ceremonial fires. As the Druids were the Celtic pre- Christian religious leaders, these embers were a sacred part of winter preparation. These embers were carried from the Druid bonfire to individual homes in...

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Guest writer Robbin Anthony on DST

DST – (Sounds like it’s spelled.)   As the golden days of summer fade into memory, we once again are faced with the task of adjusting our clocks to reflect the inevitable fall into fall. Though last week was mostly sunny, and it had been long enough since we sprang forward into spring that I had adjusted to that illogical clock changing event, next week will most likely prove to be the beginning of another unwanted adjustment period. Yes, my friends, Daylight Saving Time (DST) has once again come to an untimely end and we in Utah must now fall back into Mountain Standard Time.   Summers in Utah are way too short for me and the winters are far too long. It always seems that the end of DST coincides with the end of light. It is as if at that moment (at 2 a.m. no less) as we either manually change our clocks or the “smart” clocks change themselves (wish “smart” babies could do the same), the darkness settles in for a long winter’s dreary night. This would be all well and good if we could really all settle in for a long winter’s nap as the holiday story goes, but that tradition seems to have gone out with the advent of eternally lit fluorescent lighting.   It may surprise some readers to know that DST is...

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Lemon candy

Lemon Bars Mix: 2 cups flour 1 cup butter ½ powdered sugar Press into a 9 x 13 pan and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Beat: 4 eggs 2 cups sugar 6 Tablespoons lemon juice Add: 4 Tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon baking powder Pour onto crust and bake for 20-25 minuets or until top is brown. Sprinkle with powdered...

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Balance

Stop. Breathe. You can do it, though with your rushing from somewhere to nowhere it feels a good deal like you have forgotten how. Stop. Breathe. Once you stop, you will remember how wonderful it feels to have the fall breeze brush against your face. Once you stop, you will remember who you were rushing to be.

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