Author: Michael Sanborn

Want in on a great investment?

Students pay for a portion of the school’s athletic programs, and although the return may not be obvious when one looks at ticket sales, the program serves other purposes. Few people like paying dues and fees. Most people like cheering for at least one sports team. These two statements do not appear to follow any sense of normal logic, but on a university campus, the two are linked more closely than one would expect. As part of the cost to attend school this year, full-time students paid $616 in student fees on top of their base annual tuition. These fees paid for things such as student activities, building bonds and student health services. Approximately one-third of the money also went to support university athletics as approved by the Utah State Board of Regents. All told, athletics received in the ballpark of $3 million from the students. This raises the issue of whether or not students are receiving their money’s worth. Athletics at this school is not a money-maker. In fact, similar to most universities, it isn’t even in the black. Still, many of the teams that this university fields successfully compete in-conference and hold their own when playing out-of-conference. Two All-Americans wore wolverine green this year and a host of others have garnered Great West Conference honors. The relationship that athletics and academics have is tricky and difficult to...

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Men’s golf struggle to repeat strong performance

Oregon proved less hospitable to the men’s golf team than St. George as they battled wind and rain during the Bandon Dunes Championship. UVU finished 14th overall during the tournament March 11-12. “There were a couple of reported wind gusts of 58 miles an hour,” said coach Chris Curran, “Conditions were so bad. So for Mason [Casper] to play like he did really shows a lot about his character.” Casper shot three over par in the final round on March 12 with three birdies, including one on the 18th hole. The round was postponed for several hours as rain and strong wind continued to plague golfers all day. UVU struggled as they entered the tournament, allowing the conditions to influence their confidence and game. “We just weren’t mentally tough for the 10 hours we needed to be during the 36-hole day,” said Curran. “We’d have stretches where we’d play really good golf and then there’d be a few holes where we kind of mentally had a lapse.” Junior Andrew Carlin overcame the difficulties in the second round, putting together the best single-round and overall performance of any UVU golfer. After going 10 over par to begin day one, Carlin turned around to post a score of one over par later that day. “After the first round was over he had a new outlook,” said Curran, “He really buckled down...

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Failure to create an academic community

Low student involvement in campus events and functions hampers the academic mission of the school and damages the university environment. A quick glance of the campus gives the appearance of a vibrant university. Enrollment continues to increase so that classrooms are bursting at the seams and students constantly complain of a lack of sufficient parking space and class sections. State legislators deemed the growth sufficient to authorize the construction of a multi-million dollar expansion to the science building amid the worst economic crisis in decades. Despite this apparent clean bill of health, a serious problem plagues this school: that of students’ apathy towards involvement in the university. A student population numbering 32,670 could only muster one qualified team of candidates to apply for a spot in last month’s student elections. More applicants should be expected with such a large pool of people from which to draw. The time commitment and responsibility required to represent this student body may deter some would-be leaders, but not enough to offset the experience and credentials a student gains that can springboard them into life beyond school. More alarming than the student body’s lack of ambition is their utter uninterest to involve themselves in the decision making process. In the student government election itself, 703 students logged onto UVLink to vote. Two percent of the student body decided who would represent them and their...

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Season champs

Seniors Justin Baker, Shawn Deadwiler and Jordan Swarbrick finish their final year as regular season GWC champions. Utah Valley’s trio of seniors received a fitting finale as the Wolverines downed Houston Baptist University 67-62 on Senior Night Feb. 26 and then took the win over NJIT March 3, making them Great West Conference regular season champions. On Senior Night, despite a 4-23 record, HBU aggressively clung in the game, keeping pace with UVU until the closing seconds. Thanks to a strong defensive effort that included 48 rebounds, the Wolverines held off the Huskies’ advances and never lost the lead....

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See a need, fill a need

Affordable childcare is a problem for many parents who wish to go back to school to finish their education. Colorful paintings decorate the walls of the Wee Care Center, an apt backdrop for the children playing with toys while their parents are at school. Nine years ago, Turning Point, the on-campus Personal and Career Center for both the university and community, recognized a need for childcare services targeting single mothers attending school. It was because of this need that Carol Verbecky, Turning Point’s senior director, successfully applied for a Campus Grant to fund the center. Wee Care mirrors the motto from the 2005 children’s film, ROBOTS: “See a need, fill a need.” At its current site, state childcare regulations limit Wee Care to 60 children in the building at any given time. As part of the grant’s terms, 10 percent of the capacity is reserved for children of faculty, staff and university employees. This semester 123 children are enrolled, representing between 96 and 100 families. As the university faces expansions and growth in nearly every facet of its operation, Wee Care is facing a new need of its own. With so many students enrolling in classes, especially non-traditional students with children, the facilities at the center cannot meet the demand for their services. “There is such a need out there with the economy the way it is,” said Mary...

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