Author: Mel Sundquist

Throwing the baby out with the firewater

In a laughable attempt to balance the budget, Utah’s legislature is punishing one of the state’s few profitable agencies, presumably because it helps miscreants and moralists alike get drunk. The House and Senate passed a bill slashing the budget of the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. The bill requires that the Utah Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission cut their budget by 7.5%, or $2.2 million. This cut is significantly more drastic than cuts to most other state agencies. The legislation has not yet been signed into law by Governor Herbert, who wondered in his most recent Monthly News Conference on KUED-PBS, “If we’re making money, revenue over expenses, why would you close down a revenue source?” The Commission, in upholding fiscal requirements by the legislature, will be forced to close 13 stores – including the ones in Orem and Provo, which are the two closest to this university – and cut hours at the stores remaining open. The current legislature seems to ache for a return to pre-Huntsman near-prohibition, when revelers were required to jump through various outrageous hoops to get a little booze in their belly. Ex-governor John Huntsman dragged Utah’s outrageous liquor laws kicking and screaming towards the nation’s average, doing away with egregious per-drink limits and “private clubs.” Now these laws are being dragged, once again kicking and screaming, back to the dark sober corners of the...

Read More

Help them help us

Mental health programs need more support Although the school has an efficient suicide prevention program, the Student Health Services needs more counselors to help students struggling with depression. On Nov. 9, after a student nearly attempted to commit suicide on campus, a collective sigh of dismissal was released: He didn’t jump. Problem solved. But the issue remains that this student may have not received the preemptive support that could have prevented him from teetering on the ledge of the seventh-floor of the Computer Science building. We must not forget that the support students require goes beyond the academic. It is necessary to allocate funds and resources to help students before suicide becomes an option. The most needed forms of support within the school are to hire more salaried counselors and to more strongly encourage a student community. Currently, the majority of UVU’s depression support is found in the counseling center, through the one-person suicide prevention and awareness program, and a few outreach services through the wellness center. The counseling center has an average waiting period of two weeks before they can schedule any student’s appointment. In an emergency, one can speak to a counselor in minutes. This service is, however, limited, as the counseling center can only ensure that one counselor is free at any given time. “Take care of yourselves. I think that students aren’t sleeping enough, they’re...

Read More

Letter from the editor: December 6, 2010

Hello my darlings, Sing praises. The semester is nearly over. Now we’ll finally get to use all that brain power we waste on general education to focus on the world around us. In this issue we focus on the struggle between handmade local gifts and the assembly-line products of big business. We at The V really do hope you’ll use this season’s gift-giving to support local ethical businesses, rather than shoveling more coal into the gaping mouth of corporate greed. If it is important to you to purchase only locally-made, handmade, upcycled, etc. gifts, you can make your goal legitimate (well, as legitimate as anything on the internet can be) by visiting www.buyhandmade.org and pledging to “buy handmade for yourself and your loved ones, and request that others do the same for you.” We’ll see you next semester, dear readers — all four of you. The next issue of the UVU Review and The V will hit the stands on Jan. 10. I hope your holidays are filled with love, joy and activism. —Mel Sundquist Editor-in-chief of The...

Read More

All-inclusive Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a time of family gathering – but what about those who aren’t welcome in their own family? For Utahans alienated by their sexuality this Thanksgiving, the Utah Pride Center will host a Thanksgiving dinner for the local LGBTQ community. The Center is a Salt Lake organization that according to their website “provides support, education, outreach and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer individuals and their allies, through programs, services and resources,” The event, all-inclusive and free to the public, will include a meal, games and movies. The meal will be served from 1-3 p.m. The Center depends on community support to provide the event every year, and attendees are encouraged to volunteer or bring food.  The Center asks that homemade food items be cooked at home and brought to the event rather that cooked on-site.Drop food off between 12:30 and 1 p.m. RSVP by e-mailing to let the Center know how much food they need to provide. Contact the same e-mail address to sign up to volunteer, donate, or inform the Center of what kind of food you will...

Read More

Icicles on your bicycles?

Learn to keep up a self-propelled commute during winter All things considered, it’s harder to live an environmentally friendly life during the winter, when the environment isn’t reciprocating your friendship. Though finding local organic produce, using mass transit and cutting down your utility bills are only 40 percent more difficult according to this survey that I just made up, continuing to rely on self-propelled transportation can become close to impossible. Especially in Utah, the cold, wind, snow, ice, early darkness, lack of bike trails, and spread-out landscape can send even the hardiest bikers to the warmth of their cars. Luckily, this Tuesday John Higgins will teach a class at the Salt Lake City REI about winter bike commuting. Higgins, an REI staff member and veteran cyclist, will give attendees advice about appropriate clothing, cycle accessories, route selection, planning and necessary skills to keep those tires spinning all year long. He will also discuss common misperceptions about winter bike commuting. More info When: Tuesday, 7-8:30 p.m. Where: Salt Lake City REI, 3285 E. 3300 South Admission: Free, but registration is strongly recommended. Class size limited to 100. Info: 801-486-2100,...

Read More