Author: Loraine Gholdston

Community joins American Indian tribes in questioning legislature, UTA

Recently, a public forum was held during which leaders from the Utah Native American Tribal Council, representatives of the Utah Transit Authority and government representatives discussed the impending fate of a land tract in Draper. The following is an opinioned play-by-play of said meeting.   There wasn’t just American Indian blood boiling over recent legislature, corporate action and media coverage pertaining to the UTA Frontrunner project in Draper. The community of Draper is up in arms, as well as concerned citizens from all over the state who came to the Utah Native American Tribal Leaders meeting in Salt Lake City on Thursday to weigh in on the situation. Many interesting things came out from many different perspectives, but it seems all the people there who neither represented UTA nor the government had one thing in common: They do not like the signs they are seeing in the way UTA is conducting their activities or the way in which the legislature is handling this issue. The first problem on this issue was perceived misrepresentation by the media of negotiations with Native American tribes. The Council is currently sending a letter to the Governor and the media. According to the Council, local media had falsely claimed that the tribes had approved a deal on which the Frontrunner project was to proceed, only to later back out on it. The letter also...

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Your friends and neighbors: Midwife Tara Workman Tulley

Who are the people in your neighborhood? You’d be very surprised. And in this new Q&A interview series, The V is bringing their thoughts and opinions directly to you in order to satiate curiosities you didn’t even know you had. Due to intrigued response to our issue on homeopathic medicine, Loraine Glueck-Gholdston brings us an interview with local midwife Tara Workman Tulley. Tara Workman Tulley is a local midwife, boxer, marathon runner, mother and wife. She has delivered over 300 babies and recently returned from summiting Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. LG: Can you talk a little about your life, your family and your hobbies? How are they affected by your career as a midwife? Tara: Hobbies? Running, boxing. … I like extreme sports because they push me and are empowering. I also am a Social Work student and hope to combine the midwifery model of care to address other areas of women’s health issues. I became a midwife because it was the first time in my life that I felt empowered. I had a very emotionally and physically difficult first birth, but I had a very patient and understanding midwife. It took me several more years to work through issues that had left me believing the societal lies of body-perfection, performance expectations and why being female was a good thing in our culture. But my first birth started...

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Belly dance: The girl power of Gypsy Tapestry

It’s that time of year in Provo — the annual Gypsy Tapestry belly dance performance is about to grace the stage yet again. While Gypsy Tapestry holds performances at various locations throughout Utah and Salt Lake counties, the comfortable seating, ample stage room, and professional lighting and sound of the Covey Center for the Arts make this performance an audience and photographer favorite. Elaborate costumes, exotic music, and graceful, sultry movements are the signatures of the 10,000 year-old art form – but don’t let the sexiness of it all fool you into thinking men originally had anything to do with it. Belly dance began as exercises to aid women in childbirth, and grew into an exclusively female art (men were originally not even allowed to peek). Then European invaders changed all that. Though some women may lament that men are now allowed to watch, and even join, most enjoy the freedom of sharing their love of belly dance with an inclusive audience. The Gypsy Tapestry troupe is one of the most professional and skilled troupes in Utah, formed of advanced dancers who often are teachers as well. Beginning and intermediate classes generally perform first, with teachers and others performing solos and other small performances in-between, and the Gypsy Tapestry troupe is the grande finale — and definitely worth the wait. The Gypsy Tapestry Belly Dance performance will be Nov....

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Leaving Your Mark

No matter how far I wander on my personal excursions, no matter what I physically put myself through to hike, climb, and lose myself in the wilderness, I can’t escape it. It’s everywhere, as ubiquitous as product placement and apathy. From candy wrappers to destroyed refrigerators, the physical evidence of commercial enterprise and consumer ignorance is littered everywhere. It seems like the bygone era of corny ad campaigns like “Give a Hoot, Don’t Pollute” have become relics of a people long forgotten who actually gave a rat’s ass about things like preserving clean water and clean air and the timeless beauty of our mountains and rivers. None of that is important anymore. So what is important? I’ll tell you: what’s important is how cool you look while you’re rock climbing and tossing energy drinks down your throat, not where you toss the can. What is important is being loudly and politically critical of people who do care. You don’t want anyone telling you what to do and what not to do. You’ll throw your trash wherever you want. This is America! A country of free citizens who take the right to crap where they – and everyone else – eats very, very seriously. Not that the law hasn’t tried. Sometimes you’ll still see signs imposing hefty fines for littering, but those are few and far between. So are the...

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THE BATTLE OF THE BANDS, PROVO STYLE

At Velour,  a venue in Provo, 20 bands gathered between June 14-19 for their chance to win a giant basket of cash, a session at a local recording studio and a heap of gift certificates. Who was going to decide their fate? Me. And a few other official judges. Oh, and a few hundred fans stuffing their votes in a vintage Santa cookie jar. I enjoy the atmosphere in Velour, with its muted lighting and pure authentic ‘50s- ‘70s style décor that actually doesn’t reek of stale cigarette smoke. I judged on Friday and Saturday. As a trained anthropologist – thanks to our very impressive UVU professors –  I felt I had a unique perspective, but had no idea of how to put that in writing when I was asked to write down my credentials, as I am yet a few credit hours from my BS degree. Also, having been in on the local music scene for a decade, is hard to put that experience into words without having a title that can be capitalized. The voting system was thus: Each judge was given a score sheet with scales to rate each band on showmanship, musicianship, vocal ability, etc. I added a new category in my notebook: chick magnet spectrum. This category is unique in that, statistically, one band member can sway the chick magnet rating for the rest...

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