Author: Lindsey Linge

New Social Work degree to fill community needs

In the wake of BYU closing their undergraduate Social Work program and amidst legislative budget cuts to programs that hire social workers, it might seem an odd time for UVU to begin offering a bachelor’s degree in that area. Dr. Lars Eggertsen, however, believes that now is the opportune moment. “We wanted to be able to service Utah County and other surrounding counties in providing qualified social service workers,” said Eggertsen, an assistant professor of Behavioral Science who is set to be the program director for the new Bachelor of Social Work degree. “There was a huge need in the community and we had several community agencies talk to us and encourage us to get a program up and running.” Student interest will not be an obstacle. A desire to enter the field is seen with the nearly 400 students who are currently studying Behavioral Science with an emphasis in Social Work. But having a diploma that features Social Work, not Behavioral Science, is a boon that might make all the difference in obtaining employment or further education. In order to acquire a Social Service Worker license, students must graduate from an accredited program. This same accreditation also allows students to receive advanced standing in master’s programs, which significantly speeds up the process of obtaining advanced degrees.   The university recently applied for accreditation from the Council on Social Work...

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Aviation memorial service

Jamie Bennee and David Whitney remembered “All mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated…As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come: so this bell calls us all: but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness….No man is an island, entire of itself…any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” —John Donne Recited by President Holland at the memorial service. Two Twin Star aircrafts took the place of coffins at the school-sponsored memorial service for flight instructor Jamie Bennee and Aviation student David Whitney Jr. on Tuesday, Nov. 30. Around 250 family, friends, school officials and members of the Aviation department gathered at the Provo Airport to pay tribute. Bennee’s aunt, Kelley Patrick, described a “unique, special, amazing” woman who lived a life of service. She noted the many accomplishments of her niece, despite having a life cut short. These included serving an LDS mission in the Philippines, two degrees in Accounting and Aviation, working three jobs, a successful marriage and two children. When...

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Fatal crash of UVU plane

Although cause unclear, campus mourns loss A plane crash involving a university-owned Diamond Aircraft DA 20-C1 proved fatal in Payson on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 1:08 p.m. Jamie Bennee, a 34-year-old flight instructor and 25-year-old David Whitney, an Aviation student, were conducting a routine training flight, although it is unclear who was piloting at the time of the crash. Neither survived and an investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board is taking place. Payson resident Jose Torres reported hearing “a big thud,” immediately followed by sirens. Two or three minutes later, he stepped outside to see emergency personnel already surrounding the plane crash two doors down the street from his home. Across the street, 9-year-old Dalton Christensen and his classmates at Wilson Elementary heard a sound “just like a kabosh … like a bomb going off.” Principal Ron Penrod ran outside upon hearing of the accident and found police, firefighters and a plane that was “crinkled [and] bent in two.” A man who passed by the scene of the accident commented that the plane “couldn’t have hit a better place.” It avoided hitting both the school and nearby homes, crashing instead on the front lawn and driveway of a home on 500 West between 400 and 500 South. There were no injuries or fatalities on the ground. Candace Harris, a witness to the accident,...

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Interviews with the Vampires Dracula v. Dracula

Utah’s theater community has had enough. In an attempt to outshine sparkly vampires, two stage productions of Bram Stoker’s Dracula are being performed this October. A third group is presenting a live version based on Orson Welles’ radio adaptation. To get some insight into these dark creatures of the night, The V spoke with two of the actors portraying the legendary bloodsucker. Interview with Mark Elliot Wilson, Pioneer Theatre Company’s Count Dracula What makes this production of DRACULA different? I think that Chuck Morey, the director who also adapted it, stayed very faithful to the novel. …  This is following the narrative and plot structure of the novel very closely. How do you get into character? I think it’s not difficult because I think that everybody has that dark side to their psyche if you just open it and walk through. I think the most difficult part for most people is opening the door. I’m just trying to stay connected to the novel. [Also,] late nights and a lot of tomato juice. How long does it take you to get into your costume and makeup? It’s going to take a long time. I have three different costumes and I’m going to be flying, so there will be harnesses … It’s probably going to take at least an hour. After trying to get into his head, do you think Count...

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October is for horror

5 frightening films from the last 5 years Going through the month of October without seeing at least one horror flick is sacrilege. Variety has been a prolific spice during the last few years, so no matter one’s taste, there is bound to be something for everyone. With a cast ranging from snakes to serial killers and gypsies to non-sparkly child vampires, the ridiculous, the profound and everything in between are represented in these recommendations. 2006: SNAKES ON A PLANE The monster movie Going from Internet sensation to box office flop, this movie is exactly what the title says: There are snakes on a plane. Samuel Jackson signed up based on the title alone. Fun fact: Snakes were not permitted within 25 feet of the leading man. Go figure. 2008: LET THE RIGHT ONE IN The chilling child While the Swedish-language story keeps with the trend of engaging viewer sympathy for vampires, it does not minimize the brutality of their situation. The film is both understated and blunt. By focusing on relationships without neglecting the story line, this is as close as it gets to a perfect horror. 2009: DRAG ME TO HELL The scary spoof Prepare to alternate between gut-splitting laughter and gut-spilling grossness. While the plot about a gypsy curse is valid, the film does not take itself serious in the least and relies heavily on ridiculousness....

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