Author: John Anderson

UDOT gaining ground on traffic

The Utah Department of Transportation bought roughly two-thirds of an acre in easements from the university in January to expand Geneva Road. The land consisted of small strips nestled in between the UVU West building and Geneva Road and will be used to build a new sidewalk. The school made $167,000 from the sale, part of which will help to purchase and maintain other campus facilities. “Some of the money will be used to re-landscape the temporary easements after UDOT is finished with construction,” said Jim Michaelis, associate vice president of Facilities and Planning. The rest of the money from the sale became part of the university’s general fund. In other major plans for that part of campus, three acres of land were sold to the Utah Transit Authority for $1.2 million in July 2009. The land is south of the National Guard building and the UVU West parking lot. UTA is currently using the land to construct a road connecting Geneva road with its rail line known as Frontrunner. “Frontrunner will give better access to campus for students,” Michaelis said. UTA buses will routinely travel to and from Frontrunner to campus. UTA and UDOT will also be funding improvements to the UVU West and National Guard building parking lot. “The current road leading into the MATC parking lot will be turned into more parking stalls,” Michaelis said. The...

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Mapping Obesity

The Interdisciplinary studies program hosted its second annual Contours of Knowledge conference on Friday, Dec. 3. Students presented various projects from mapping social trends in obesity to mapping identity in memories and mapping a fictitious world. Alisha Giles, a senior, presented to a room of about 100 students, teachers and guests the correlations between poverty and obesity in America. Part of her presentation included a map of the United States made up of green, yellow and red Jell-O. The color of the Jell-O represented poverty while the heighth represented obesity. Texas was one of the states that showed a high rate of both poverty and obesity on the Jell-O map. Giles grew up in a family with healthy eating habits and said she believes unhealthy eating is a choice. “I then got married, got poor and only could buy cheap unhealthy food,” Giles said. “The key is getting enough food storage on your shelf to make healthy...

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To Russia with love

Student Body President Richard Portwood, accompanied by 14 fellow student body presidents from around the country, wrapped up an eight-day-long trip to Moscow to foster U.S.–Russian relations on Nov. 20. The presidents met with the Russian Agency for Youth affairs, an association that sponsors pro-Kremlin youth groups such as the Youth Guard and the Nashi, to share ideas on student government. “Building positive relationships between Russian and American youth is the goal,” Portwood said when asked in an interview about the trip’s purpose. Portwood offered the Russian Agency of Youth Affairs a copy of the UVU Constitution, since most Russian universities don’t have a student council. Portwood was asked by Rusty Butler, associate vice president for International Affairs and Diplomacy, to gather fellow student body presidents from around the country to attend the meeting. The trip has been in the making since September and is completely funded by the Russian Government. When Portwood received the invitation, he immediately invited every student body president in the state of Utah to attend with a number of presidents from Ivy League schools such as Stanford, Harvard, Berkley and Georgetown. The Russian government sifted out many of Utah’s larger schools such as The University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Out of the 14 schools represented from the U.S., four are from Utah: UVU, Dixie State, Westminster and Snow College. “UVU is among...

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American Indian heritage month

Pay attention to pre-Pioneer Utah You didn’t know we’re in the middle of American Indian Heritage Month, did you? We live in Utah, but most of what we know about our state’s history takes place after 1847. The stories of people who lived here before Mormon settlers arrived have seldom been given attention in Utah classrooms. This history, both here and around the country, is tinted with blood and harsh feelings, yet these relationships shaped American identity, language and awesome holidays. American Indian Heritage Month is the time for Utah’s students to learn about and experience the peoples and cultures that were in this area before we Easterners moved here. “We want folks to acknowledge the original inhabitants of Utah and their contributions,” said Forrest Cuch, director of the Utah Division of Indian Affairs. Goshute, Paiute, Shoshone, Navajo and Ute nations were contributing to this Western environment centuries before covered wagons and brick houses were littering the landscape of the Wasatch region. American Indian Heritage Month aims to remind different generations of Utahans about the history of this state’s indigenous people. “We’re finding that people know very little,” Cuch said. “They don’t know the lifestyle, the contributions. Some don’t even know that Utah is named after one of the first inhabitants.” Different aspects of American Indian history and culture will be on display and discussed throughout November. This is...

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Professor speeds to new record

Racing at 190 mph, Todd Low made history during the World of Speed event at the Bonneville Salt Flats on Sept. 17. Low, an automotive instructor on campus, sped off with his fifth land speed record in his‘69 El Camino. The world record is for the Classic Blown Gas Coupe Size AA. The El Camino, painted black with a wolverine on the side, boasts a 572-cubic inch engine displacement with turbo boosters. “Most everything is custom built,” Low said. Those in attendance at the World of Speed included over 600 high school students from around the state. The Students were invited and fed by the automotive department. The students watched over 300 international participants competing in various classes, all under heavy regulations and safety precautions. “They require 60 safety items that we have to pass,” Low said. Twenty pounds of fire extinguisher equipment and a full fire suit are just a few of the items participants are required to carry. Since school started, Low and his team of six students worked every day until midnight to get ready for the competition. “The students all contribute to the El Camino,” Todd said. “We work as a team.” When asked how much the students participate in working on the car, student and Team Crew Chief Tony Anguiano said, “Todd tells me what needs to be done and I delegate it to...

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