Author: Gladis Higginbotham

A writer’s final words before graduating

Gladis was a writer, the assistant news editor, and created and edited the Spanish section for the UVU Review. I started writing for UVU Review in the News section in the spring of 2007. I was working 40 hours a week at a local bank as an investment banker and had four classes. With weekly assignments, scheduling time for interviews, writing and editing, writing for News was a struggle. I can tell you, however, that the basic concepts I learned through writing for the Review were not taught in any of my theory classes. Being really engaged in your education truly pays off. There is so much going on in the newsroom with so many different people, but everyone is working toward the same goal. It is chaos; it is absolute hard work and very competitive, even in a school setting. Reliability is another important aspect when it comes to writing for the newspaper, so if you are writing for the paper, make sure you are reliable and get your story done on time. As a writer, you will rarely see everything that goes on behind the curtain, but if you become part of the staff of editors, you will experience what is like to be in that environment. I want to take you into the newsroom and give you a small perspective of what is going on in...

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Human trafficking in Utah growing by the numbers

A worldwide business bringing in $43 billion a year trafficking humans is closer to Utah than most residents realize. Peace and Justice Studies, joined by the Honor society and Phi Theta Kappa hosted “Slavery in Utah: Human Trafficking” on Dec. 2 in hopes of raising local awareness. Human trafficking is the buying and selling of people. “Most people associate this with just sex,” said Jacque Baumer, a student of Peace and Justice Studies and coordinator of the event. “But it’s more than that, it is also labor and domestic slavery and it happens in Utah all the time.” The panel included: Brad Manuel, executive director of Operation 61; Lindsay Hadley, executive director of Child Rescue; Gina Bellzatine, program coordinator of Victims Services-Utah Health and Human Rights; Detective Rob Woodbury, Utah State Trafficking Task Force; and Virginia Sudbury, state human trafficking attorney. “It’s happening in the playground, in peaceful neighborhoods, in malls and at school,” Baumer said. “The main targets are children in elementary and junior high schools, as well as men and women of all ages.” According to Baumer, there are about 300,000 American children and youth in the world who are at risk for sexual exploitation and sex trafficking every year, making up 50 percent of the victims in the world. “Trafficking victims come from a range of backgrounds and many may come from middle and upper class...

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Aqui y Ahora: Un sueño casi realizado

El Presidente Obama urge al Congreso a votar si o no a la proposición después del día de Acción de Gracias. El sueño de muchos estudiantes inmigrantes indocumentados está en proceso de hacerse realidad con la proposición del “Dream Act.” Estos estudiantes se han encontrado entre la espada y la pared después de terminar la secundaria.  “He vivido casi toda mi vida en los Estados Unidos, me trajeron cuando tenía 5 años, no conozco a nadie en México.” Rocío Soria comenta. “Me gradué de la secundaria y asistí unos años a la universidad en New York City, pero no pude continuar mis estudios.” Una vez graduados de la secundaria, si no pueden pagar por la matrícula de la universidad, estos estudiantes, frustrados y desanimados, empiezan a trabajar en cualquier cosa que encuentren para poder sobrevivir y ayudar a la familia. La razón es que estos estudiantes no pueden recibir ayuda financiera o préstamos en la universidad. Una vez graduados, no pueden usar su educación para trabajar y mejorar la comunidad porque no tienen documentos legales. Así es que muchos deciden no ir porque no cambia nada en su vida y prefieren trabajar ilegalmente para poder sobrevivir. La proposición Dream Act podría cambiar esta realidad; pero muy pocos saben que es el Dream Act, de qué se trata y a quiénes podría beneficiar Dream Act permitirá a alguien que entró...

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Away from home for the holidays

UVU’s International Students find a way to celebrate when going home isn’t an option. Thanksgiving is coming up and with all the celebrations, get-togethers and students flying everywhere to spend time with their families, one has to stop for a moment to realize that it is not easy for international students to leave the country to party with their families. Most gather together in their apartments and intermingle with each other by playing games and watching movies – but, of course, without food, there’s no celebration. This has been the way Mohammad Mustafa, an international student from Jordan, has spent the last four years he’s been here. This year, however, his friends have decided that they are traveling to somewhere warmer to have some fun in the sun. “I will be going with them,” Mustafa said. “We haven’t decided whether it is Vegas for sure or California, but either way, we will be going somewhere to have fun.” Naser Alajmi from Saudi Arabia loves to hang out with his friends and will be accompanying them on this exciting trip. “I will be going to Vegas to shop and gamble for the entire weekend,” he said. “But for Christmas, I will be going home to Saudi Arabia.” Since Thanksgiving is a North-American holiday, most of the international students have become familiar with it while here in the United States, so...

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Freedom Highway

Speaker promotes icon symbolizing responsibility Veterans Day is a day of reflection and thanksgiving for the freedoms many sacrificed their lives to give. On such a special day, the Utah Democracy Project invited Dr. Daniel L. Bolz to speak to students with a lecture titled “Freedom Highway.” According to Professor David R. Keller, Center for the Study of Ethics director and professor of Philosophy, the Utah Democracy Project is a theme that the Center of Ethics has developed to have open forums about public policies in which citizens and students have an opinion in democracy. “Scholarship and study is a lonely, solitary activity, right?” said Keller. “You sit in the library, I sit in the library and that program is called ‘ethics across the curriculum’ … The Utah Democracy Project is meant to complement the solitary study with open public forums where we come together and talk about living in an open society, focusing in the responsibility you have to educate yourself in issues and get the students involved in the democratic process.” “An absolute basic, true message, with great freedom comes great responsibility … It has to be in our hearts, it has to be in our minds and it has to be in our actions.” Responsibility was the main subject in the lecture given by Dr. Bolz. In his opening statement, he mentioned Dr. Viktor E. Frankl’s...

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