Author: Emma Hunt-Samudio

Thank you for your decency

When the Managing Editor of the UVU Review lost her engagement ring last month, the kindness extended to her was moving. But she wonders, how far will people allow their kindness to extend when people are different? She shares her story here. Two and a half weeks ago, I got married to the love of my life. Expounding on the details would be unprofessional and uninteresting, and reliving that happy day is not my point anyway. Rather, the point is just how wonderful and decent people really can be, and maybe how much farther we have to go. Though I lost my one-of-a-kind antique engagement ring less than a month before the wedding, I was able to wear that ring at the ceremony because of the honesty of a fellow student. And I was able to weather what I thought was the permanent loss of a tremendously sentimental item because of the kindness and generosity of countless others. You may have seen the “Lost” flyers I posted, or the ad in this newspaper my friend designed for me. You may have seen me, a sobbing mess, and my then-fiancée, composed and resolute, scouring the lawn outside the PE building for a glimmer of white gold. You may have seen the growing and diverse group of people crouched over, eyes to the ground, doing the same. You may have even...

Read More

State Board of Regents vote to approve tuition increases

On Friday, the Utah State Board of Regents approved a tuition rate increase at each of Utah’s public colleges and universities – Dixie, SUU, USU, U of U, Snow, Weber, SLCC and UVU. The average increase is 7.5 percent, with Dixie facing the sharpest increase at 11.8 percent, SLCC the lowest at five percent. UVU students will pay 7.4 percent more in tuition, or $272 over the 2010-2011 rate of $1836. Despite the increase, UVU’s tuition will remain less expensive than that of peer institutions in other states. Regents voted to approve the increase in order to help keep the State’s higher educational institutions afloat after a 2.5 percent drop in state funding to colleges and universities last year and a $100 million decrease over the last three years. This loss of State funding presented a challenge to Utah’s colleges and universities in the face of unprecedented enrollment, and Utah’s Commissioner of Higher Education William Sederberg hopes that the tuition increase will help support that growth, as well as maintain and improve accreditation and industry...

Read More

Making a break for it

We all have a different concept of what constitutes an enjoyable evening. Not every personality is compatible with every other personality. In everyday life, these differences can be both enriching and aggravating, but on a date they can become positively unbearable. In these situations, it’s handy to come to a date armed with exit strategies when he takes you to Beto’s and insists on reciting the entirety of Monty Python and the Holy Grail just for you, the alleged love of his life. When it comes to dealing with bad dates, there are an infinite number of variations on three basic approaches. First, you can play dirty. This includes any method that involves an element of deception, such as excusing yourself to go to the bathroom and making a run for it when he’s not looking. The benefit of this approach is that it avoids immediate awkwardness or hurt feelings – if you’re skillful. If you feel neither confident nor right about deceiving your date, then your performance won’t come across convincingly, and you’ll both hurt his feelings and look like a jerk. The other danger is that if you “accidentally” spill Dr. Pepper in you lap and need to go home to change clothes, he may be left thinking the date was going swimmingly and will ask you out again. Other techniques include The Curfew and The “Emergency.”...

Read More

Faculty Q&A reveals teacher priority remains their students

For a meeting that will help make or break UVU’s reputation and future, the representation of UVU’s over 2,240 teachers at the faculty meeting with the Northwest Council on Colleges and Universities was somewhat sparse. The gathering of adjunct, part-time and full-time instructors in the library auditorium at 11 a.m. on Nov. 3 only numbered about 20, not counting the members of the NWCCU seated on the edge of the stage and casually sauntering in during the first few minutes. The meeting which was held Q&A style to recognize and address the faculty’s concerns for the institution. Jonathan Lawson, chief academic officer at Idaho State University and NWCCU council member, led the meeting. “What’s going to happen,” he said to the audience and, gesturing to his fellow council members, “is that these people have questions they want to ask you. Now, this is anything but an inquisition.” He had one question for the faculty himself, he said, but indicated that he wanted to save it for a later time in the meeting. “None of you are allowed to ask [it],” he said, glancing in mock sternness at his NWCCU colleagues. What followed in that hour was certainly, as Lawson had assured, anything but an inquisition. Members of the council asked questions relating to various areas of concern specific to UVU and its growth, and teachers answered frankly. Some answers...

Read More

‘Ghost Town’ on display in library

After a devastating fire and a century and a half of decline following an economic nosedive, by 1920 Bodie, California — once a booming Wild West metropolis — remained home to fewer than 150 people. Today, Bodie is home only to a transitory community of state employees and museum guides who work to preserve it in a state of “arrested decay” as a National Historic Landmark. Over the summer, Michaela Giesenkirchen Sawyer, associate professor and director of Humanities, joined this community to photograph and document Bodie’s disintegration. An exhibit displaying the outcome of her project, titled “Ghost Town,” opened Sept. 16 on the third floor of the Library. In its prospecting heyday Bodie was one of California’s most populous and notorious cities, at one time boasting 65 saloons on its main street and a thriving red light district. Today, the crumbling homes and businesses are littered with thoroughly dusty turn-of-the-century artifacts, door frames and rafters lie in heaps of splinters among weathered floorboards and table settings remain as they were at their exact moment of abandonment. It was in these suspended details of mining life that Sawyer found and captured what she calls “the ghostliness of desertion.” Arresting and strangely beautiful in its muted colors and disarrayed subjects, the series observes and even celebrates the melancholy juxtaposition of social and domestic spaces with now-obsolete machinery in the process of...

Read More