Author: Danni Freeman

Summer fun, in the classroom

Summer semester can be a great time to take classes. Not only does it offer a way to speed up graduation, but there are people on campus which can make it a more relaxing atmosphere. On top of this there is also a great variety of classes offered that can be fun, educational and sometimes very unique. Here are some interesting options to consider. Desert Natural History BIOL490R/ GEOL495R Catherine Stephen, T. Heath Ogden, Daniel Stephen and Renee Van Buren The deserts of southern Utah are a popular summertime destination. This class will give students the opportunity to spend time exploring this area while providing them with information about different aspects on desert life. The course is co-taught by several professors from the science department, each of whom will be able to provide facts about their areas of interest. This class will meet twice on campus (May 10 and 12) followed by two weeks spent at the Capitol Reef Field Station. Paint Your Own Car CRT 100R Norman Cox or Lonnie Wilson It is always a bonus to have something to show for a class other than a grade. This class promises students a way to show off all their hard work. For this course, students can bring in their own cars and use proper techniques learned in class to paint them. Writing Natural History ENGL 486R Scott Hatch...

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Students create change by serving the community

Last week marked the fourth annual UVolunteer week held by the Volunteer and Service-Learning Center. This week focused on a push for students to serve the community and live up to the service council’s motto of “Be the Change.” For last week’s events, the service council teamed up with several different organizations from around campus. Members of student government, the Multicultural Club, international student council and UV Mentors, as well as other programs, joined together in this effort. Each of these groups picked a day to help host a service project. “It gets UVU organizations involved, working together on projects,” said Natalie McMaster, service council president. “A lot of students responded really well because we were able to represent different demographics and a lot of people were better reached.” Most of these service projects focus on helping the community around the school. The service council works together with community partners and help to assess what these needs might be. This year, projects included assembling humanitarian kits for United Way, an Adopt-a-Grandparent evening, a field day at the Dan Petersen School for special needs children and an Adopt-a-Highway trash cleanup on Geneva Road. Although the service council felt this event was a success, the turnout could have been greater. For most of these projects, about 30 to 40 students showed up to participate. Out of a school of over 30,000...

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Discovering Sican

For Peru, 1992 was a time of turmoil and civil unrest. Amid all of the chaos, Dr. Izumi Shimada was busy uncovering 1000-year-old tombs that contained around $1.5 million in treasure while being guarded by a single member of the National Police armed with an unloaded machine gun. Shimada, who is now teaching anthropology at Southern Illinois University, never expected his life to turn out this way. In 1978, he embarked on this project to uncover archeological evidence to shed light on the Sican culture that flourished on the Northern Coast of Peru from 900 to 1100 A.D. Shimada told himself that he would devote 15 years to the project. Thirty-three years later, Shimada is still working on discovering more about this ancient culture in a project that has now become the longest-running research study in his field of archeology. On Feb. 25, Shimada addressed students gathered in the Ragan Theater about his findings. Shimada focused his presentation on two main tombs that he excavated and what information they were able to draw from them. According to Shimada, the Sican were a very influential cultural group during this time period. They had social stratification, advanced metal working knowledge, economic wealth, political clout and were otherwise unrivaled by any of the other surrounding cultures. All of this insight provided by Shimada was the first of its kind to surface. It...

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College survival 101

The college experience is often remembered by a lack of sleep and countless hours of studying. Students spend a lot of time stressing over making the most of their time and still getting good grades. No matter how long anyone has been in college, it is never too late to learn better study habits. On Feb. 22, the UVU Mentor program held a one hour workshop called “College Survival 101” where students were taught simple techniques to help them get more out of their study time. The mentors offered tips on things such as taking notes and retaining the information that has been studied. Most everyone has used some form of flash cards to help them remember information for a test. The mentors suggested an alternative to the word/definition version of these cards. They recommended that students pose both the term and the definition in the form of a question, such as “What is the area of a rectangle?” and “What is width times height?” By doing this, either side of the card can be looked at without giving away the answer. These cards are easy to carry around, which allows one to study periodically throughout the day. Another point that the mentors mentioned is to try to avoid overexerting the brain during study sessions. After about 20 minutes of study time, the brain begins to be less productive....

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No ordinary doctor

In the place of the lab coat one would expect from a doctor, Patch Adams entered the stage wearing baggy pants with orange flowers, a colorful button-up shirt and a tie-dyed tie. He had long hair, half of which was dyed a bright shade of blue, tied in a pony tail that extended to his waist. To top it off, he had a single fork earring hanging from one of his ears. The fact that Adams was no ordinary physician became clear to almost everyone seated in the Grande Ballroom on Feb. 15 when Adams came to speak. This strange appearance did not deter students from staying to hear his speech. The audience nearly filled the Ballroom with the overflow extending into the commons with those who came to hear Adams’ secrets to living a happy life. Adams didn’t always live his life with such enthusiasm. During his late teens, Adams was hospitalized three different times after attempted suicides. During his third stay, Adams made two decisions that would change the rest of his life. First, Adams decided to study medicine to enable him to help serve humanity. During medical school, Adams came up with an idea for a hospital that was focused on helping the patients, not on profit. The hospital ran for 12 years and served roughly 15,000 patients who weren’t charged for these services. Throughout Adams’...

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