Author: Clark Goldsberry

COWBOY POETRY GATHERING AND BUCKEROO FAIR.

Good news and bad news. First the good: Although seemingly few people know this, Utah is home to one of the largest annual cowboy poetry gatherings in the world. Now the bad: If this is the first time you’ve heard about it, it’s too late. The 2012 Heber City Cowboy Poetry Gathering & Buckeroo Fair was held from Oct. 31 to Nov. 5. Every November, thousands of cowboys sit down with thousands of city slickers to celebrate the roots of the great American West. Cowboy poetry is a contemporary art form steeped in rich tradition. In the early days of the wild frontier, cowboys and ranch hands gathered around the campfire at the end of each day to entertain each other by telling stories and singing folk songs. Because illiteracy was so common, poetic devices like poor grammar, incom- prehensible slang and slurred strings of words have become identifying marks of contemporary cowboy poetry. To Mary Kelly, co-organizer of Heber City’s Cowboy Poetry Gathering for the past 18 years, the event is an essential part of keeping our modern society grounded. “The gathering is part of our heritage, and we’re trying to keep it alive,” Kelly said. “They’re not making any more cowboys.” “We don’t want people to forget the cowboy heritage that established not only Utah but the West,” said Tom Whitaker, founder of the event. The event...

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Letter from the Editor HEX

We’re not revolutionaries or anarchists, although some of the individuals featured on these pages might be. At first glance these stories may not seem related. But one of the unifying characteristics is a craving to question societal norms and find a better way, even if, in the case of Guy Fawkes, the approach is severely misguided. Analyzing societal norms is essential, I think. And the people who do it are usually the ones who garner the most influence and promote the most change—whether in the form of politics, cowboy poetry or pizza. Too much of a stretch? Probably. These articles have essentially nothing in common, but we hope you enjoy them...

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Studio 760’s 2nd Show

Fire spreads quickly.   Especially when the conditions are right.   A dry season, a gentle breeze and a few young kids with a box of firecrackers is all it takes to send an entire mountain range up in flames.   Utah County could use some fire, and a few young artists are bringing it.   Despite previous attempts to kindle sparks, the fine art niche in Utah County has always been a weak flickering flame, at best. But according to some, the conditions are better now than they’ve ever been, and a drastic change in the Valley’s thermostat...

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Springville Museum highlights the diversity of contemporary Utah art

Fine art is alive and well in Utah valley and the Springville museum is out to prove it.   The new show, “10 Artists, 10 Views” is a survey of up-and-coming artists in our community.   “Many of these artists are emerging into the professional art scene and stepping into the national spotlight,” said Ashlee Whitaker, associate curator for the past three years. “We have so many exciting artists in Utah. The main objective of the show is to help people get excited about contemporary Utah art.”   The show seems incredibly disjointed, incorporating a wide variety of mediums,...

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Looking at Disability from a Different Perspective

Michael Ririe has been taking photos for a long time. But his photos aren’t just photos, they are studies in psychology. His work deals with the human spirit—both his own and that of others—and the struggles and triumphs entwined with life. His recent project is an extensive photojournalistic essay on the Now I Can Foundation, which is a non-profit group that helps children with disabilities (such as cerebral palsy) become more independent through physical therapy. Even though the treatment comes from a non-profit, the cost is still burdensome for many families, and many families rely on donations from the community. Ririe’s objective is to raise awareness for this organization. An exhibition of his photographs will be on display Feb. 10 at the SCERA Center for the Arts, Gallery 101. Copies of Ririe’s first book, containing fine duotone reproductions of his images, will be for sale at the gallery for $29.99, and all proceeds from the book sales will benefit patients who can’t afford therapy. “I introduced myself to the Now I Can Foundation early in 2011 with hopes of collaborating to create an awareness documentary that would be helpful to their noble cause. It has turned into much more than that,” Ririe said. “My initial approach was to stand back and quietly observe while these patients received their therapy. They didn’t let me simply observe for long as they...

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