Author: Chris Drew

Hemp

Issues across the nation in regards to boundaries between federal and state laws have been occurring since the creation of the Constitution. Whenever an opinion differs towards any given law there will be a process that will put the integrity of that law into question. In reply to an inquiry concerning cannabis laws to Utah state Governor Gary Herbert, his office stated that Herbert “supports current law[s] regarding marijuana use in Utah. [That] there is no need to change laws that work and are supported by a majority of Utahns.” According to Jeremiah Bowen, a junior studying constitutional law and Studies at UVU, the issues concerning the legalization of Cannabis are a prime example of how our state leaders don’t always understand how their decisions affect the communities they represent. How could the Federal and State Govern- ments cooperate in respect to the rights of what the people of each state deem fit for their communities if the law makers in each state have such differing opinions without the willingness to talk about the laws’ implications? “The Tenth amendment states that any power not expressly given by the Constitution to the Federal Government should be given to the State Governments to make their own laws and regulations,” Bowen said. “However, a specific section called the ‘ Elastic Clauses’ has caused resistance from the Federal Government towards certain State laws.”...

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Healing with Music

Striking chords in the hearts of many, Christmas is a time for reflection and doing good deeds for others. Project Heals Christmas concert We Rejoice Thee was performed Dec 6th at the Covey Center for the Arts, Provo Center Street, by the Salt Lake Pops Orchestra. This performance was in dedication to becoming more aware of how to better support those we know with problems facing addictions and poverty. Having been created a decade ago, Project Heal has held the goal that proper education and musical inspiration there can begin the process of recovery for those that have been stuck in downward spirals of negativity in their lives. According to Nathanial Drew, Alumnus Bachelor of Music and conductor of SL Pops Orchestra, Project Heal had approached them via Facebook after viewing a few YouTube videos created by the orchestra. “ All the proceeds are going towards those in need this season,” Drew said. “ Since this group really is working for charity causes, of course, it’s a great pleasure to be a part of something that’s for the benefit of others.” After graduating in 2008 Drew began working in advertising and though the SL Pops Orchestra had begun performing a year and half ago. Only in the past six months has Drew fully focused all his time into the orchestra. According to Drew he has learned more by working...

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Competition issues

Kicks, flips, spins, and twirls to the beat of finger-snapping music—a competition dedicated to pushing the limits of physical ability and creativity was awe-inspiring. On Wednesday, Nov 14, 2012, at the Physical Education courts, UVUSA held their third annual Best Dance Crew competition. The evening had several interesting complications before Low Profile was declared winner. According to Jared Maruji, UVUSA Fine Arts Chair, the evening’s issues were unforeseen and were handled as quickly and as appropriately as possible. “Even though audience attendance was more than what I expected,” Maruji said, “ I couldn’t have hoped for a more patient and helpful group of people.” During an opening gag-skit by the hosts of the event, the first technical problem occurred when one of the microphones went dead. The second malfunction was during the performance by Six Feet Underground. “We had practiced earlier in the day with the technical equipment, so we were able to quickly figure out what needed to be replaced and readjusted,” Maruji said. “But sometimes things can be beyond our immediate control.” Because of the technical difficulties that Six Feet Underground experienced during their first set, Garret Crawford, a Judge for the event (and Hip Hop teacher at UVU), gave them a second chance. According to Crawford, it wouldn’t have been fair to judge them on their first effort. “[Because of the technical snags during their first...

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The classics of art evolve

Nov 8, 2012 was the first of three consecutive nights in the Ragan Theater where audiences were mesmerized. These nights were dedicated to Imagination, Creativity and Innovation by UVU’s School of the Arts, eloquently executed by the School of the Arts Dance Departments Repertory Ballet Ensemble. The dancers had finesse, poise and grace, having learned and continually in the process of learning to master their positions. Expectations were surpassed as the company used a variety of dance forms to transfer feelings into visual meanings. Mark Borchelt, Co-Artistic Director for the production, between the second and third sets had made comments regarding evolution of the arts, specifically dance. “The classics are the foundation of every step,” Borchelt said. “But everything evolves with the needs of the time.” Addressing the concerns of those who have had a hard time seeing the importance of dance programs, Borchelt suggested that their practicality is overwhelming. Borchelt gave praise to Joni Tuttle, an Alumni who choreographed the second arrangement Off Beat. According to Borchelt she is an example because of her enthusiasm towards dance and she has opportunities open to her that could progress her life financially. “She graduated from our program, now she is teaching,” Borchelt said. “ It’s a cycle that meets the demands of the career [and life-style.]” When a production is put together correctly emotions of the audiences should be stirred...

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