Author: Chase Knudsen

We love our families, but do we have to talk to them?

The holiday seasons are at our doorstep where mom tries to gather all her children home for Christmas. The air is thick with anxiety to near max and conversations with your family start off subtle, but end up in a downward spiral of awkward. Trying to talk to the brother you haven’t spoken with for half a dozen months. Or the sister that you honestly can’t stand. Much like Johnathan Franzen’s novel The Correction’s, (pictured above) which came out Sept. 1, 2001, to acclaimed success by exploring the lives of the Lamberts, a traditional, Midwestern family who are trying...

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John Green breaks hearts not promises by delivering intoxicating new novel

Turtles All the Way Down, a new book by John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars and known for his teenage angst and rom-com quirky love stories brings all of that and more in his latest novel.  The book’s title is an old philosophical joke, which in brevity says this: A well-known scientist once gave a public lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits the sun and how the sun, in turn, orbits around the center of a vast collection of stars called the galaxy. At the end of the lecture, a little old lady...

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The Voiceless reveals harrowing reality of sexual assault against men

A somber feeling rests over the tranquil audience at Center Stage. A slight hum of the projector is the only noise to be heard as the people wait in their seats for the movie to begin.  Students for Choice,  an advocacy group that fights for social justice invited UCASA to show a screening of The Voiceless, a documentary telling heartbreaking, personal stories of five men who survived sexual assault. This was made to help more men who have survived sexual assault find their voice. The men in the movie come from all cultures and backgrounds. “Sexual violence does not...

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Never Let Me Go author wins Nobel Prize

The 2017 Nobel Prize in literature was awarded to British novelist, screenwriter and short storyteller, Kazuo Ishiguro by The Swedish Academy, bringing much less controversy than last year’s Nobel Prize winner, Bob Dylan. His award brought much discord among many literary critics because he is more known for his singing and song writing than literary prose. However, Ishiguro is a well-known author and notably known for his acclaimed novel Never Let Me Go published in 2005. The Swedish Academy describes Ishiguro as the man “who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense...

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Live on wild side and read a banned book

Many of us can agree that breaking the rules can be more exciting than keeping the rules, such as watching the speed dial go higher in a car or jaywalking. So, it is no surprise we, as rebellious U.S. citizens, celebrate banned books week. Breaking the rules and reading a banned book is exciting . Above the noise to the west of the Fulton Library, a straight dead-eye shot from Starbucks sits a book display of some banned books that many students have enjoyed reading, such as: Harry Potter series, Hunger Games trilogy, Matilda, Beloved and much more. Censoring literature, which began with the Roman Catholic church in the mid-1500s in Europe, has been in practice for hundreds of years and has always brought controversy. The celebration of banned books came about in the early 90s when the American Library Association (ALA) wanted to raise awareness to literature that was considered too peculiar. This showed how there are many people in the world who want to censor the rest of us. Books become censored for one of two reasons. Content within the pages, such as promiscuity, adult language, suicide, etc., or the overall theme of the novel and the influence it potentially has on its readers, are all excuses used to ban books. “[Banning books] doesn’t help society at all. It is harmful and destructive,” English senior Megan Mankins...

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